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Why 'event cloaks' could be the key to the ultimate bank heist

Date:
July 1, 2011
Source:
Institute of Physics
Summary:
Scientists describe a new type of invisibility cloak that does not just hide objects -- but events.

In this month's special issue of Physics World, which examines the science and applications of invisibility, Martin McCall and Paul Kinsler of Imperial College London describe a new type of invisibility cloak that does not just hide objects -- but events.

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Using the ultimate bank heist as an example, McCall and Kinsler explain how a thief could, in principle, use an "event cloak" to steal money from a safe, without even the CCTV surveillance cameras being aware.

The burglar would somehow need to split all the light approaching the safe into two parts: "before" and "after," with the "before" part sped up and the "after" part slowed down.

This would create a brief period of darkness during which the burglar could enter the scene and steal the money, being careful to close the safe door before they leave.

With the safe-cracker gone, the process of speeding up and slowing down the light would then be reversed, leading to an apparently untouched scene once again.

Robbing a bank is, of course, only an example to illustrate the principle of what an event cloak could do. As McCall and Kinsler explain, a more likely application of a full-size event cloak would be to control the flow of signals in an optical routing system, where one may need to process simultaneous uninterrupted signals at the same time.

For these aspirations to become a reality, suitable materials need to be developed that can manipulate the light to speed it up or slow it down. The consensus seems to be that a set of parallel, artificially structured "metamaterial" layers would be needed, each containing an array of tiny metallic elements that can be controlled to dynamically adjust the speed of light passing through.

If a high-performance, macroscopic-size, fully functional space-time cloak could be developed, one potential "party trick" could be a Star Trek-type transporter, in which a person could appear to instantly relocate from one point to another.

Although no-one has yet tried to build a space-time cloak in the lab, McCall and Kinsler argue that "there is no obvious reason why such a cloak could not be achieved quite soon, perhaps even within a few years."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Institute of Physics. "Why 'event cloaks' could be the key to the ultimate bank heist." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630215959.htm>.
Institute of Physics. (2011, July 1). Why 'event cloaks' could be the key to the ultimate bank heist. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630215959.htm
Institute of Physics. "Why 'event cloaks' could be the key to the ultimate bank heist." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630215959.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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