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Faster 3-D nanoimaging a possibility with full color synchrotron light

Date:
July 14, 2011
Source:
University of Melbourne
Summary:
Researchers can now see objects more precisely and faster at the nanoscale due to utilizing the full color spectrum of synchrotron light, opening the way for faster 3-D nanoimaging.

Researchers can now see objects more precisely and faster at the nanoscale due to utilising the full colour spectrum of synchrotron light, opening the way for faster 3-D nanoimaging.

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This new methodology will provide for enhanced nanoimaging for studying bio samples for medical research, improved drug development and advanced materials for engineering.

Using the Advanced Photon Source, a synchrotron facility in Chicago, USA, researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (CXS), headquartered at the University of Melbourne, Australia, revealed that by utilizing the full spectrum of colours of the synchrotron, they increased the clarity of biological samples and obtained a 60-fold increase in the speed of imaging.

Professor Keith Nugent, Laureate Professor of Physics at the University of Melbourne and Research Director of CXS, said the discovery was an exciting development.

"Typically for best imaging, researchers need to convert samples to crystals, but this is not always possible in all samples," he said.

"This discovery of utilising full colour synchrotron light to improve precision and speed of imaging has huge potential in the field," he said.

The international project was led by Dr Brian Abbey of the University of Melbourne's School of Physics and CXS, whose team made the discovery.

"We will now be able to see things in detail at the nanoscale much more easily. It is like going from an old film camera to the latest digital SLR.'

"The increase in speed, in particular, opens the way for us to see things faster in 3D at the nanoscale, which has previously taken an impracticably long time," Dr Abbey said.

The paper was published in the journal Nature Photonics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Melbourne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brian Abbey, Lachlan W. Whitehead, Harry M. Quiney, David J. Vine, Guido A. Cadenazzi, Clare A. Henderson, Keith A. Nugent, Eugeniu Balaur, Corey T. Putkunz, Andrew G. Peele, G. J. Williams, I. McNulty. Lensless imaging using broadband X-ray sources. Nature Photonics, 2011; 5 (7): 420 DOI: 10.1038/nphoton.2011.125

Cite This Page:

University of Melbourne. "Faster 3-D nanoimaging a possibility with full color synchrotron light." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701101752.htm>.
University of Melbourne. (2011, July 14). Faster 3-D nanoimaging a possibility with full color synchrotron light. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701101752.htm
University of Melbourne. "Faster 3-D nanoimaging a possibility with full color synchrotron light." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701101752.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

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