Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Significantly more genetic mutations lead to colon cancer

Date:
July 18, 2011
Source:
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers say there are at least 70 genetic mutations involved in the formation of colon cancer, far more than scientists previously thought.

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center say there are at least 70 genetic mutations involved in the formation of colon cancer, far more than scientists previously thought.

Based on the study, published in the July 2011 Cancer Research (Priority Reports), researchers are suggesting a new approach to colon cancer treatments targeting multiple genes and pathways simultaneously. Current cancer treatments target just one or two known cancer-driver genes believing this would be beneficial to patients. While patients may get transient tumor burden reduction, almost universally tumor growth returns.

The UT Southwestern research contradicts previous thinking that only a few mutated genes are important in the development of cancerous tumors.

"The ways we've been treating patients up to now is to just go after one target when we should be going after three to four different pathways simultaneously," said Dr. Jerry W. Shay, vice chairman and professor of cell biology at UT Southwestern.

Under the old model, scientists believed there were 151 candidate genes and that mutations in just eight to 15 of them would lead to cancer. There were 700 other genes classified as passenger genes whose mutations were incidental to cancer growth.

"Those numbers are dead wrong," Dr. Shay said. According to UT Southwestern's research, there are 65 candidate genes and at least five passenger genes whose mutations play significant roles in cancer development. Inactivating the function of any of these tumor-suppressing genes led to a key step in cancer development called anchorage-independent growth, meaning cells piled up on top of each other rather than aligning neatly.

The next step is further research to classify more accurately which genes drive cancer and which are merely passengers.

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study were lead author Ugur Eskiocak, student research assistant in cell biology; Dr. Sang Bum Kim, postdoctoral researcher in cell biology; Peter Ly, student research assistant in cell biology; Dr. Andres Roig, assistant professor of internal medicine; Dr. Sebastian Biglione, a former postdoctoral fellow in cell biology; Crystal Cornelius, research assistant in cell biology; Dr. Woodring Wright, professor of cell biology and internal medicine; and Dr. Michael White, professor of cell biology.

One researcher from UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center also participated. The study was supported by grants from NASA and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. U. Eskiocak, S. B. Kim, P. Ly, A. I. Roig, S. Biglione, K. Komurov, C. Cornelius, W. E. Wright, M. A. White, J. W. Shay. Functional Parsing of Driver Mutations in the Colorectal Cancer Genome Reveals Numerous Suppressors of Anchorage-Independent Growth. Cancer Research, 2011; 71 (13): 4359 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-0794

Cite This Page:

UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Significantly more genetic mutations lead to colon cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110718085327.htm>.
UT Southwestern Medical Center. (2011, July 18). Significantly more genetic mutations lead to colon cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110718085327.htm
UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Significantly more genetic mutations lead to colon cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110718085327.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) — A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) — A 111-year-old Japanese was certified as the world's oldest man by Guinness World Records on Wednesday. Sakari Momoi, a native of Fukushima in northern Japan, was given a certificate at a hospital in Tokyo. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) — Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins