Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Comprehensive immigrant and refugee health guidelines new resource for Canadian physicians

Date:
July 25, 2011
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
The largest, most comprehensive evidence-based guidelines to immigrant health -- designed to help Canadian physicians meet the unique needs of this group -- have just been published.

The largest, most comprehensive evidence-based guidelines to immigrant health -- designed to help Canadian physicians meet the unique needs of this group -- are being published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Related Articles


Immigrant and refugee health needs may differ significantly from those of Canadian-born people as they may have been exposed to different diseases, environment and living conditions as well as genetic factors.

The guidelines, based on evidence from around the world, are focused on helping primary care physicians provide for the often complex health needs of immigrants and refugees. Created by the Canadian Collaboration for Immigrant and Refugee Health, the project involved more than 150 investigators, including 43 family doctors, 34 researchers, staff and nurse practitioners as well as other authors.

The size of Canada's immigrant population is growing but there is a lack of evidence-based information on approaches to immigrant health. Worldwide, there are more than 200 million international migrants whose movement across borders has significant health impacts for many countries. While health task forces in Canada and the US have developed clinical prevention recommendations, they are not directly tailored toward the unique backgrounds and needs of immigrants and refugees.

"Use of evidence-based methods has yet to substantially affect the field of migration medicine," writes Dr. Kevin Pottie, University of Ottawa, with coauthors. "Our evidence reviews synthesized data from around the world, and our recommendations focus on immigrants, refugees and refugee claimants, with special attention given to refugees, women and the challenges of integrating recommendations into primary care," he states.

"Our recommendations differ from other guidelines because of our insistence on finding evidence for clear benefits before recommending routine interventions," state the authors. For example, in the case of possible intestinal parasites but no symptoms, the guidelines recommend blood testing for certain parasites and forgoing traditional stool testing, marking a shift in practice.

The package includes a summary document, clinical guidelines to immigrant health, online case studies and detailed evidence and methodologies. Content focuses on four areas: infectious diseases; mental health and physical and emotional maltreatment; chronic and noncommunicable diseases; and women's health. Detailed indexes on specific illnesses and conditions including post-traumatic stress, mental health, pediatric issues and more make it easy for physicians to find information.

The first few sections of the guidelines were published in CMAJ online in June 2010. This is now the comprehensive package of the full guidelines.

"More work must be done to improve immigrants' access to health services," conclude the authors. "We hope this evidence-based initiative will provide a foundation for improved preventive health care for immigrant populations."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kevin Pottie, Christina Greenaway, John Feightner, Vivian Welch, Helena Swinkels, Meb Rashid, Lavanya Narasiah, Laurence J. Kirmayer, Erin Ueffing, Noni E. MacDonald, Ghayda Hassan, Mary McNally, Kamran Kahn, Ralf Buhrmann, Sheila Dunn, Arunmozhi Dominic, Anne E. McCarthy, Anita J. Gagnon, Cécile Rousseau, Peter Tugwell; and coauthors of the Canadian Collaboration for Immigrant and Refugee Health. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for immigrants and refugees. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.090313

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Comprehensive immigrant and refugee health guidelines new resource for Canadian physicians." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110725123357.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2011, July 25). Comprehensive immigrant and refugee health guidelines new resource for Canadian physicians. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110725123357.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Comprehensive immigrant and refugee health guidelines new resource for Canadian physicians." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110725123357.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins