Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Clue to cause of childhood hydrocephalus: Excess of natural molecule can bring about the devastating 'water on the brain' condition in mice

Date:
September 10, 2011
Source:
Scripps Research Institute
Summary:
Scientists have found what may be a major cause of congenital hydrocephalus, one of the most common neurological disorders of childhood that produces mental debilitation and sometimes death in premature and newborn children.

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found what may be a major cause of congenital hydrocephalus, one of the most common neurological disorders of childhood that produces mental debilitation and sometimes death in premature and newborn children.

The research appears in the September 7, 2011, issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Hydrocephalus, which involves excess buildup of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, affects about 1 in 500 children in the United States. Currently only symptomatic treatment exists -- the surgical placement of a shunt to drain away excess fluid. Researchers want to know the condition's causes, so they can figure out how to prevent and treat it. Scientists have known for some time that hydrocephalus was linked to bleeding events in the developing brain, but the reason for that linkage has not been clear.

The new study now suggests that hydrocephalus can be triggered by abnormal levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a blood-borne lipid that can enter the brain in high concentrations during bleeding events, with profound effects on developing brain cells. The study showed that both blood and LPA itself acted through the same receptor (receptors are proteins to which one or more specific kinds of signaling molecules bind) to produce defects in the brains of developing mice that led to severe hydrocephalus; genetic removal of a specific LPA receptor or pre-treatment with a compound that blocked the receptor largely prevented the condition.

"This provides proof of concept for the medical treatment of this disease," said Jerold Chun, MD, PhD, a professor at Scripps Research and its Dorris Neuroscience Center, and senior author of the new study, "and it also hints that this mechanism involving LPA could be relevant to other neurological conditions associated with altered brain development."

A Eureka Moment

Chun's laboratory specializes in the study of lipid-signaling molecules involved in the developing brain, including LPA. LPA is normally produced in the fast-growing fetal brain, and appears to be important for the normal development of neural "progenitor" cells. But when the researchers added abnormally high concentrations of LPA to the brains of fetal mice, they found an unexpected effect on brain development. "When we looked at their condition as newborns, we were surprised to see that they uniformly had big, fluid-filled brains," said postdoctoral fellow Yun Yung, PhD. "It was a Eureka moment, because we realized that LPA might help explain hydrocephalus."

Reviewing the medical literature on the condition, Chun and Yung noted that it was often linked to brain-bleeding events in the womb and typically also featured some improperly developed brain structures. "Our experiments with LPA connected both sets of findings," said Yung, "because LPA is involved in blood clotting and can reach very high concentrations during hemorrhages; plus, our LPA-exposed mouse brains had structural abnormalities like those reported in human cases."

Cerebrospinal fluid cushions the brain, provides it with basic nutrients, and is normally produced by the membrane-like choroid plexus within the fluid-filled chambers of the brain known as ventricles. Ependymal cells that line these ventricles have hair-like extensions that are thought to promote the normal flow of fluid. "In our LPA-exposed mice, there were patches in the ventricular lining where these ependymal cells were missing, which could have led to a disruption of the normal cerebrospinal fluid flow," said Yung. Structures in the ventricles that normally permit the proper drainage of fluid also appeared to be partly blocked by the improper overgrowth of cells, which might have further contributed to the brain-damaging fluid buildup.

The researchers were able to repeat these effects using the normal LPA-containing fluid fractions of blood, thus showing that bleeding events plausibly can lead to hydrocephalus by increasing the brain's exposure to LPA.

To investigate how LPA exerted this effect, the team produced mice that genetically lack one or both of the two receptors -- LPA1 and LPA2 -- to which LPA can bind on ventricle-building fetal progenitor cells, finding that the LPA1 receptor was required to produce hydrocephalus. "The idea here is that excess LPA causes these ventricular progenitor cells to get the wrong developmental signals via their LPA receptors, and so the ventricles and brain develop abnormally," said Chun.

In a final demonstration, the team pre-treated normal fetal mice with a compound that blocks the activation of LPA1 receptors, and found that even after LPA exposure, their signs of hydrocephalus were greatly reduced.

Looking Ahead

LPA1-blocking drugs currently are being developed for other conditions including lung fibrosis, and the new finding from Chun's lab may lead biotech or pharmaceutical companies to study their use in hydrocephalus. "If you had an unborn baby who was at risk from an injury to the mother, an infection, or evidence of bleeding then, in principle, you could treat with a short-acting LPA1 blocker to prevent or reduce hydrocephalus," said Chun.

The discovery that excess LPA can wreak havoc in the developing brain could have broader implications as well. Abnormally high concentrations of LPA may be generated by fetal brain cells themselves, also producing abnormal LPA signaling. Moreover, schizophrenia, autism, and other developmental brain disorders have also been linked to fetal bleeding events and infections as well as ventricular abnormalities.

"It's something that we need to investigate further," said Chun, "but it may be that excess LPA exposure in an unborn child's brain can have a variety of adverse effects on development, depending on the part of the brain that's exposed, the stage of brain development, and the duration of the exposure."

Additional Chun lab members contributing to the study, "Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling May Initiate Fetal Hydrocephalus," were Tetsuji Mutoh, now at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology; Mu-en Lin; Kyoko Noguchi; Richard R. Rivera; Ji Woong Choi, now at Gachon University of Medicine and Science in Korea; and Marcy A. Kingsbury, now at Indiana University.

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Hydrocephalus Association.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Scripps Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Y. C. Yung, T. Mutoh, M.-E. Lin, K. Noguchi, R. R. Rivera, J. W. Choi, M. A. Kingsbury, J. Chun. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling May Initiate Fetal Hydrocephalus. Science Translational Medicine, 2011; 3 (99): 99ra87 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002095

Cite This Page:

Scripps Research Institute. "Clue to cause of childhood hydrocephalus: Excess of natural molecule can bring about the devastating 'water on the brain' condition in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110907142159.htm>.
Scripps Research Institute. (2011, September 10). Clue to cause of childhood hydrocephalus: Excess of natural molecule can bring about the devastating 'water on the brain' condition in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110907142159.htm
Scripps Research Institute. "Clue to cause of childhood hydrocephalus: Excess of natural molecule can bring about the devastating 'water on the brain' condition in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110907142159.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins