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Introducing the monarch butterfly genome

Date:
November 23, 2011
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
The Monarch butterfly is famous for its ability to travel up to 2,000 miles from North America to central Mexico every fall. Now, it's enjoying fame of a different sort. Researchers now report the full genomic sequence of this iconic butterfly. The new genome is the first for any butterfly. It is also the first complete genome of any long-distance migrant.

In this issue, Zhan et al. (pp. 1171–1185) present the draft genome of the monarch butterfly that reveals a full set of protein-coding genes. The analysis provides insight into genes central to major aspects of the long-distance migration, including sun compass navigation, reproductive quiescence, and longevity.
Credit: Cell Volume 147, Issue 5 , Zhan et al

The Monarch butterfly is famous for its ability to travel up to 2,000 miles from North America to central Mexico every fall. Now, it's enjoying fame of a different sort. In the November 23rd issue of Cell, researchers report the full genomic sequence of this iconic butterfly. The new genome is the first for any butterfly. It is also the first complete genome of any long-distance migrant.

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"With this genome sequence in hand, we now have an overwhelming number of opportunities to understand the genetic and molecular basis of long-distance migration," says Steven Reppert of the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Reppert's team has been studying the monarch migration for years, with a particular interest in how their brains incorporate information in time and space to find their way. Monarchs are all the more remarkable given that migrating butterflies are always at least two generations removed from those that made the journey the previous fall. "It is in their genes," Reppert said.

The researchers focused their genome analysis on pathways known to be critical for this migration, including those responsible for vision, the circadian clock, and oriented flight. The genome also revealed the complete set of genes required for synthesizing juvenile hormone. Changes in that hormone are required for migrating butterflies to shut down reproduction and extend their lifespan up to nine months. By comparison, non-migrants only live for about a month.

Comparisons of the new monarch genome with other insect genomes also reveal that butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are the fastest evolving insect order yet examined.

"Overall," the researchers write, "the attributes of the monarch genome and its proteome provide a treasure trove for furthering our understanding of monarch butterfly migration; a solid background for population genetic analyses between migratory and non-migratory populations; and a basis for future genetic comparison of the genes involved in navigation yet to be discovered in other long-distance migrating species, including vertebrates like migratory birds."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shuai Zhan, Christine Merlin, JeffreyL. Boore, StevenM. Reppert. The Monarch Butterfly Genome Yields Insights into Long-Distance Migration. Cell, 2011; 147 (5): 1171 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2011.09.052

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Introducing the monarch butterfly genome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111123133129.htm>.
Cell Press. (2011, November 23). Introducing the monarch butterfly genome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111123133129.htm
Cell Press. "Introducing the monarch butterfly genome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111123133129.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

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Monarch Butterfly Genome Sequenced

Nov. 23, 2011 Each fall, millions of monarch butterflies from across the Eastern United States use a time-compensated sun compass to direct their navigation south, traveling up to 2,000 miles to an overwintering ... read more

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