Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers take a step forward in transplanting pig cells to regenerate human cartilage

Date:
February 22, 2012
Source:
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute
Summary:
Researchers have recently studied the response of human NK cells against porcine chondrocytes. The results of the research indicate that these cells, characteristic of the innate immune system, play an important role in the rejection of xenotransplantation of porcine chondrocytes.

Researchers at IDIBELL's New Therapies on Genes and Transplantation group have studied the response of human NK cells (Natural Killer) against porcine chondrocytes (cartilage cells). The results of the research, published in The Journal of Immunology, indicate that these cells, characteristic of the innate immune system play an important role in the rejection of xenotransplantation (from another species) of porcine chondrocytes.

NK cells

NK cells are part, together with neutrophils and macrophages,of the first line of cellular defense and they are involved in not-acquired immune response, the innate response. They are responsible for identifying specific cell types (tumor, infection or foreign to the body) and they lyse them by toxicity.

The number of NK cells is a minority, but their importance is increasing in the field of transplantation, according to the study's lead author, Cristina Costa, "we see that innate immunity plays an important role in regulating of acquired immunity, which is critical for the rejection of transplanted organs."

Xenotransplantation

The Costa team's goal is the porcine chondrocytes transplantation in humans to repair cartilage injuries. So they have studied "in vitro" response of human NK cells in the presence of pig cells. They noted that under conditions of transplant, high presence of antibodies and cytokines, human NK cells make a cytotoxic response and they lyse (destroy) foreign cells, in this case the chondrocytes.

"In this work we have characterized several molecules involved in the processes of adhesion and cytotoxicity of NK cells," explained the researcher, who believes that this work opens the way on how to continue the investigation "on the one hand we have to fight the deposition of antibodies that is a critical factor in increasing the toxicity and on the other we must work to reduce cell adhesion by modifying any of the molecules we have involved."

The next step for clinical application of xenotransplantation proposed by Costa cartilage would be "the genetic modification of porcine chondrocytes, so that human NK cells don't recognize them as foreign, thus avoiding rejection."

Transplantationof cartilage

Cartilage transplantation between humans is not been widely applied in the clinic but it has been successful in the regeneration of this tissue in traumatic injuries, especially in athletes. Autologous transplants are performed with cells from the same person and allogeneic ones with cells from another person, "in both cases," says Costa, "the limitation is the amount of cells. If we can get xenotransplantation it would increase the amount and quality of the cells available for transplantation of cartilage."

In the future, according to the researcher, "maybe we could apply the xenotransplantation of pig chondrocytes on osteoarthritis patients or even with rheumatoid arthritis," but warned Costa "in these cases are combined other inflammatory and immune processes hindering the outcome of the transplantation."

Researchers from the Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg in Germany have collaborated in the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sommaggio R., Cohnen A, Watzl C. and Costa C. Multiple receptors trigger human NK cell-mediated citotoxicity against porcine chondrocytes. The Journal of Immunology, 2012 DOI: 10.4049/%u200Bjimmunol.1100433

Cite This Page:

IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. "Researchers take a step forward in transplanting pig cells to regenerate human cartilage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120222132741.htm>.
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. (2012, February 22). Researchers take a step forward in transplanting pig cells to regenerate human cartilage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120222132741.htm
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. "Researchers take a step forward in transplanting pig cells to regenerate human cartilage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120222132741.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins