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Camera on NASA Mars Odyssey tops decade of discovery

Date:
February 29, 2012
Source:
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Summary:
Ten years ago, on Feb. 19, 2002, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), a multi-band camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, began scientific operations at the Red Planet. Since then the camera has circled Mars nearly 45,000 times and taken more than half a million images at infrared and visible wavelengths.

The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft has completed an unprecedented full decade of observing Mars from orbit.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU

Ten years ago, on Feb. 19, 2002, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), a multi-band camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, began scientific operations at the Red Planet. Since then the camera has circled Mars nearly 45,000 times and taken more than half a million images at infrared and visible wavelengths.

"THEMIS has proven itself a workhorse," said Philip Christensen of Arizona State University, Tempe, the camera's principal investigator and designer. "It's especially gratifying to me to see the range of discoveries that have been made using this instrument."

Highlights of science results by THEMIS over the past 10 years include:

  • Confirming a mineral exposure selected as the landing site for NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity
  • Discovering carbon-dioxide gas jets at the south polar ice cap in spring
  • Discovering chloride salt deposits across the planet
  • Making the best global image map of Mars ever done
  • Identifying safe landing sites landing sites for NASA's Mars Phoenix lander by finding the locations with the fewest hazardous boulders
  • Monitoring dust activity in the Martian atmosphere
  • Discovering that a large crater, Aram Chaos, once contained a lake
  • Discovering that Mars has more water-carved channels than previously thought
  • Discovering dacite on Mars, a more evolved form of volcanic lava not previously known on the Red Planet

THEMIS combines a five-wavelength visual imaging system with a nine-wavelength infrared imaging system. By comparing daytime and nighttime infrared images of an area, scientists can determine many of the physical properties of the rocks and soils on the ground.

Mars Odyssey has a two-hour orbit that is nearly "sun-synchronous," meaning that Odyssey passes over the same part of Mars at roughly the same local time each day. In September 2008 its orbit was shifted toward an earlier time of day, which enhanced THEMIS' mineralogical detection capability.

Says Christensen, "Both Odyssey and THEMIS are in excellent health and we look forward to years more science with them."

NASA launched the Mars Odyssey spacecraft April 7, 2001. Odyssey arrived at Mars Oct. 24, 2001. After arrival the spacecraft spent several months in a technique called aerobraking, which involved dipping into the Martian atmosphere to adjust its orbit. In February 2002, science operations began.

Odyssey is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft. JPL and Lockheed Martin collaborate on operating the spacecraft. For more about the Mars Odyssey mission, visit: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey . For more about THEMIS, see http://themis.asu.edu/ . JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Camera on NASA Mars Odyssey tops decade of discovery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120229111112.htm>.
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (2012, February 29). Camera on NASA Mars Odyssey tops decade of discovery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120229111112.htm
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Camera on NASA Mars Odyssey tops decade of discovery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120229111112.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

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