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Two repressor genes identified as essential for placental development

Date:
April 16, 2012
Source:
Ohio State University Medical Center
Summary:
Two particular repressor genes in a family of regulatory genes are vital for controlling cell proliferation during development of the placenta. Their absence in stem cells results in a placenta made up of overcrowded and poorly organized cells that cannot properly transport oxygen and nutrients or support normal embryonic development. The study show how these genes control cell proliferation in living animals.

The E2F family of genes is thought to play a crucial role in regulating cell proliferation. It is unclear how these genes carry out their function and interact with one another in intact animals. This study shows that two E2F repressor genes are essential for a functional placenta and for balancing the effect of an E2F activator gene.

Two particular repressor genes in a family of regulatory genes are vital for controlling cell proliferation during development of the placenta, according to a new study by researchers with the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James).

The two genes are called E2f7 and E2f8. Their absence in stem cells results in a placenta made up of overcrowded and poorly organized cells that cannot properly transport oxygen and nutrients or support normal embryonic development.

When placental stem cells were also missing a third gene, the activating gene called E2f3a, the placental defects were corrected and embryos carried to birth.

The study, published in the journal Developmental Cell, shows at the molecular level how these E2Fs control cell proliferation in intact animals, the researchers say.

"The findings provide insight into the role of these two repressor genes," says principal investigators Gustavo Leone, associate professor of Medicine and associate director of Basic Research at the OSUCCC -- James.

The two genes belong to a family of regulatory genes that, in humans, has eight members. They are all believed to activate or suppress other genes to control cell division and proliferation in both normal and cancer cells. But which genes they regulate and how they interact with one another in living animals is poorly understood.

"E2F regulatory genes have been thought to be important for a long time, but with so many of them, it's been hard to tell which one is doing what," Leone says.

"Here, we show that the repressors E2f7 and E2f8 are essential for the development of an intact, functional, placenta, and that they balance out the effects of the activating gene E2f3a," Leone says. "Because these two repressors are important for proliferation, they may also play an important role in suppressing tumor development."

For this study, Leone and his colleagues used animal models that lacked one or more of the three E2F genes in trophoblast stem cells, which give rise to the placenta.

Earlier work led by Leone has shown that in some cases, one E2F gene can be an activator in some tissues and a repressor in others.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Madhu M. Ouseph, Jing Li, Hui-Zi Chen, Thierry Pécot, Pamela Wenzel, John C. Thompson, Grant Comstock, Veda Chokshi, Morgan Byrne, Braxton Forde, Jean-Leon Chong, Kun Huang, Raghu Machiraju, Alain de Bruin, Gustavo Leone. Atypical E2F Repressors and Activators Coordinate Placental Development. Developmental Cell, 2012; 22 (4): 849 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2012.01.013

Cite This Page:

Ohio State University Medical Center. "Two repressor genes identified as essential for placental development." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120416125318.htm>.
Ohio State University Medical Center. (2012, April 16). Two repressor genes identified as essential for placental development. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120416125318.htm
Ohio State University Medical Center. "Two repressor genes identified as essential for placental development." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120416125318.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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