Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Folic acid food enrichment potentially protective against childhood cancers

Date:
May 22, 2012
Source:
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center
Summary:
Researchers have found folic acid fortification of grain products in the United States may have an impact on lowering some childhood cancers. The new research shows fortification does not appear to be causing childhood cancer rates to increase, and also finds a notable decrease in two types of childhood cancer.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Washington University in St. Louis have found folic acid fortification of grain products in the United States may have an impact on lowering some childhood cancers.

The new research, published online May 22 in the journal Pediatrics, shows fortification does not appear to be causing childhood cancer rates to increase, and also finds a notable decrease in two types of childhood cancer.

This study was led by Amy Linabery, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in the University of Minnesota's Division of Pediatric Epidemiology and Clinical Research, and Kimberly Johnson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, and co-authored by Julie Ross, Ph.D., professor and director of the Division of Pediatric Epidemiology and Clinical Research at the University of Minnesota. Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Children's Cancer Research Fund, Minneapolis.

Grain product fortification began in 1996, after the FDA determined prenatal folic acid could benefit infants by reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects (such as spina bifida) and wanted to expand the benefits to all newborns. The population-level study by Linabery and colleagues compared data for incidence of childhood cancers before and after fortification began, using statistics from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) between 1986 and 2008; more than 8,000 cancer cases were evaluated.

"We were looking to see if rates for childhood cancers dropped following the fortification mandate," said Linabery. "We were also watching closely to see if any cancers appeared to increase during the same time frame."

While some cancers appeared unaffected by the fortification, others showed a notable decrease following the FDA mandate. Specifically, both Wilms tumor, the most common type of kidney cancer in children, and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), a type of brain tumor, saw a significant decrease in occurrence following the start of grain product fortification. No cancers appeared to rise in response to fortification according to the analyzed data.

The lack of rising cancer rates suggests that the folic acid fortification does not appear to cause unintended harm for children. Linabery also points out the primary benefit of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects, adding to the case for continued fortification.

There is much more research to be done. Linabery says, "These results help generate further hypotheses regarding folic acid's potential impact in cancer biology. The data we found on Wilms tumor and PNET in children warrants a closer investigation to determine the role of folic acid in possibly preventing these diseases."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Minnesota Academic Health Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. M. Linabery, K. J. Johnson, J. A. Ross. Childhood Cancer Incidence Trends in Association With US Folic Acid Fortification (1986-2008). Pediatrics, 2012; 129 (6): 1125 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-3418

Cite This Page:

University of Minnesota Academic Health Center. "Folic acid food enrichment potentially protective against childhood cancers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 May 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522115034.htm>.
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center. (2012, May 22). Folic acid food enrichment potentially protective against childhood cancers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522115034.htm
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center. "Folic acid food enrichment potentially protective against childhood cancers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522115034.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

More Coverage


Folic Acid May Reduce Some Childhood Cancers

May 21, 2012 Folic acid fortification of foods may reduce the incidence of the most common type of kidney cancer and a type of brain tumors in children, finds a new study. Incidence reductions were found for ... read more

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins