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Ibuprofen improves bone repair after surgery or a fracture, study suggests

Date:
July 3, 2012
Source:
University of Granada
Summary:
An in vitro study has demonstrated that a therapeutic dose of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen improves bone repair.

A study conducted at the University of Granada has demonstrated that ibuprofen ­-a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)­- has beneficial effects on bone repair after a fracture or following bone surgery.In vitro tests demonstrated that -unlike other NSAIDs- when a therapeutic dose of ibuprofen is administered, it has no negative effects on the proliferation and synthesis of obsteoblast osteocalcin, a cell which is directly involved in the formation and regeneration of bones.Osteoblast cells are bone cells that synthesize the bone matrix. Consequently, osteoblasts play a major role in bone development, growth, maintenance and repair.

Positive Results

In an article recently published in the  Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, the University of Granada researchers report the positive effects of ibuprofen on bone repair. The researchers are members of the research group BIO277, which studies the effects of different pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies on obsteoblast cells.

The primary author of this article, Concepción Ruiz Rodríguez, a professor at the University of Granada Nursing Department states that "up to date, we had little information on the effects of ibuprofen on osteoblast cells." The University of Granada study demonstrates that a therapeutic dose of ibuprofen (5-25 µm.) does not inhibit the proliferation and synthesis of osteocalcin in the MG-63 cell line. However, when higher doses are administered (>25 µm.) they may activate other cells, which might explain the expression of membrane markers and the decrease in the phagocytic capacity.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Granada. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lourdes Díaz-Rodríguez, Olga García-Martínez, Elvira Luna-Bertos, Javier Ramos-Torrecillas, Concepción Ruiz. Effect of ibuprofen on proliferation, differentiation, antigenic expression, and phagocytic capacity of osteoblasts. Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 2012; DOI: 10.1007/s00774-012-0356-2

Cite This Page:

University of Granada. "Ibuprofen improves bone repair after surgery or a fracture, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120703134100.htm>.
University of Granada. (2012, July 3). Ibuprofen improves bone repair after surgery or a fracture, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120703134100.htm
University of Granada. "Ibuprofen improves bone repair after surgery or a fracture, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120703134100.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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