Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Higher healing rate using unique cell-based therapy in chronic venous leg ulcers

Date:
August 2, 2012
Source:
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Summary:
A new study finds that treating chronic venous leg ulcers with a topical spray containing a unique living human cell formula provides a 52 percent greater likelihood of wound closure than treatment with compression bandages only.

Treating chronic venous leg ulcers with a topical spray containing a unique living human cell formula provides a 52 percent greater likelihood of wound closure than treatment with compression bandages only.

That's the conclusion of a new study conducted in part at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and published online by The Lancet this week.

The Phase II clinical trial, which investigates the efficacy of HP802-247 from Healthpoint® Biotherapeutics, was designed to determine effectiveness of certain cell concentrations and dosing frequencies of HP802-247, when combined with standard care in treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers.

William Marston, MD, professor of surgery in the UNC School of Medicine and medical director of the UNC Wound Healing Clinic, is an investigator in the study and one of the article authors.

Venous leg ulcers are caused by impaired circulation in the vein system of the legs from blockages or damage. Typically, venous leg ulcers become chronic wounds if, after three months of standard treatment, they fail to heal. Chronic venous leg ulcers appear as open lesions and need specialized medical care. An estimated 1-2 million Americans suffer from venous leg ulcers.

HP802-247 is a living human cell formula consisting of skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), which release growth factors into the wound on a cellular level for tissue regeneration, along with fibrinogen, which forms a "cellular web" for blood clotting and elasticity. During the study, 228 patients were enrolled at 28 medical centers in the United States, including UNC. Two different cell concentrations and two separate dosing frequencies were tested with standard care, in addition to a control group, over a 12-week period.

Dr. Marston says, "In the past, some chronic venous leg ulcers were treated with skin grafts, which occasionally could break down and also required the patient to heal a partial thickness wound at the skin graft harvest site. During this study, unique living cells were sprayed on the patient's wound, which interacted with the patient's cells for improved wound healing."

"In the study, we determined the best dosing of the fibroblast/keratinocyte preparation that markedly accelerated the rate of healing of the wounds. We are currently preparing a Phase III pivotal trial to start late this year," adds Dr. Marston.

The study was funded by Healthpoint® Biotherapeutics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Robert S Kirsner, William A Marston, Robert J Snyder, Tommy D Lee, D Innes Cargill, Herbert B Slade. Spray-applied cell therapy with human allogeneic fibroblasts and keratinocytes for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers: a phase 2, multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60644-8

Cite This Page:

University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Higher healing rate using unique cell-based therapy in chronic venous leg ulcers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802183750.htm>.
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. (2012, August 2). Higher healing rate using unique cell-based therapy in chronic venous leg ulcers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802183750.htm
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Higher healing rate using unique cell-based therapy in chronic venous leg ulcers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802183750.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) — President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) — A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

AFP (Sep. 15, 2014) — The European Commission met on Monday to coordinate aid that the EU can offer to African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite The Risks, Antibiotics Still Overprescribed For Kids

Despite The Risks, Antibiotics Still Overprescribed For Kids

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) — A new study finds children are prescribed antibiotics twice as often as is necessary. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:  

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile iPhone Android Web
      Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins