Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New wave of technologies possible after ground-breaking analysis tool for nanometer devices developed

Date:
August 26, 2012
Source:
University of Sheffield
Summary:
A revolutionary tool has enabled researchers to analyze nanometer-sized devices without destroying them for the first time, opening the door to a new wave of technologies.

The nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus -- developed by the University's Department of Physics and Astronomy -- will allow for further developments and new applications for nanotechnology which is increasingly used in harvesting solar energy, computing, communication developments and also in the medical field.

Scientists can now analyse nanostructures at an unprecedented level of detail without destroying the materials in the process, a limitation researchers across the world faced before the Sheffield experts' breakthrough.

Dr Alexander Tartakovskii, who led a team of researchers, said: "We have developed a new important tool for microscopy analysis of nanostructures. In the very tiny quantities of matter used in nanostructures the behaviour of electrons and photons is governed by new quantum effects, quite different from what happens in bulk materials. This makes them attractive for various new technologies.

"Development requires careful structural analysis, in order to understand how the nanostructures are formed, and how we can build them to enhance and control their useful properties. Existing structural analysis methods, key for the research and development of new materials, are invasive: a nanostructure would be irreversibly destroyed in the process of the experiment, and, as a result, the important link between the structural and electronic or photonic properties would usually be lost. This limitation is now overcome by our new techniques, which rely on inherently non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probing."

The results open a new way of nano-engineering, a full characterisation of a new material and new semiconductor nano-device without destroying them meaning more research and development and device fabrication processes.

Dr Tarakovskii added: "We have developed new techniques which allowed unprecedented sensitivity and enhancement of the NMR signal in nanostructures. Particular nanostructures of interest in our research are semiconductor quantum dots, which are researched widely for their promising photonic applications, and potential for the use in a new type of computer hardware employing quantum logic.

"The result of our experiments was quite unexpected and changed our understanding of the architecture of these nanomaterials: we learned new information about the chemical composition of quantum dots, and also how atom alignment inside the dots deviates from that of a perfect crystal. Importantly, many more measurements of optical and magnetic properties can be done on the same quantum dots which have undergone the NMR probing."

The development of the new techniques and all experimental work was carried out by Dr Evgeny Chekhovich in the group of Dr Alexander Tartakovskii at the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Sheffield. Quantum dot samples used in this work have also been fabricated in Sheffield, in the EPSRC National Facility for III-V Semiconductor Technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sheffield. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Sheffield. "New wave of technologies possible after ground-breaking analysis tool for nanometer devices developed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120826143526.htm>.
University of Sheffield. (2012, August 26). New wave of technologies possible after ground-breaking analysis tool for nanometer devices developed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120826143526.htm
University of Sheffield. "New wave of technologies possible after ground-breaking analysis tool for nanometer devices developed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120826143526.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Virtual Reality Headsets Unveiled at Tokyo Game Show

Virtual Reality Headsets Unveiled at Tokyo Game Show

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Several companies unveiled virtual reality headsets at the Tokyo Game Show, Asia's largest digital entertainment exhibition. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stocks Hit All-Time High as Fed Holds Steady

Stocks Hit All-Time High as Fed Holds Steady

AP (Sep. 17, 2014) The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday that it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low because a broad range of U.S. economic measures remain subpar. Stocks hit an all-time high on the news. (Sept. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 16, 2014) Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' startup will team up with Boeing and Lockheed to develop rocket engines as Elon Musk races to have his rockets certified. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
MIT's Robot Cheetah Unleashed — Can Now Run, Jump Freely

MIT's Robot Cheetah Unleashed — Can Now Run, Jump Freely

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) MIT developed a robot modeled after a cheetah. It can run up to speeds of 10 mph, though researchers estimate it will eventually reach 30 mph. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins