Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema development in the lungs

Date:
September 3, 2012
Source:
European Lung Foundation
Summary:
A new study has found evidence that marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema, where fluid builds up in the lungs.

A new study has found evidence that marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema, where fluid builds up in the lungs.

The study will be presented Monday (Sept. 3, 2012) at the European Respiratory Society's Annual Congress in Vienna.

Despite mounting evidence of the link between strenuous exercise and pulmonary edema, experts still debate whether the two factors are linked. Researchers from the United States and Italy aimed to investigate the link by assessing whether running a marathon triggers pulmonary edema which causes breathlessness, severe cough and even heart attacks or respiratory failure in serious cases.

The team analysed 26 runners who had completed the 2011 Steamtown Marathon in the USA. They took chest radiographs of the runners the day before the race and then at 19, 56 and 98 minutes after the race. By monitoring these different stages, the researchers were able to ensure that any increase in blood volume would return to normal, so they could objectively assess the level of edema.

Three readers evaluated the radiographs to interpret the image. Two readers were experts in reading chest films, a third was a general radiologist. They weren't told which radiographs were taken before or after the race, but they scored each image on the level of edema present so that the total score ranged from 0 (no edema) to 8 (severe edema). The edema scores from each reader was averaged.

About 50% of runners had some level of pulmonary edema at about 20-minutes post-race. 20% of those runners had moderate to severe pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was still present 1 hour after the marathon was completed.

Women were at much higher risk compared to men in the development of pulmonary edema. There was also no relation between marathon time and the development of pulmonary edema, suggesting that the development of edema is prevalent across all abilities.

Lead author, Dr Gerald Zavorsky from the Marywood University, USA, said: "Marathon running is linked to an increased risk of pulmonary edema, and it seems that women are at higher risk than men regardless of marathon finishing time. While pulmonary edema can be a negative consequence of marathon running, regular exercise can also keep you fit and healthy. We do not yet know the impact of this finding on long-term health of runners."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Lung Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Lung Foundation. "Marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema development in the lungs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120903143137.htm>.
European Lung Foundation. (2012, September 3). Marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema development in the lungs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120903143137.htm
European Lung Foundation. "Marathon running could trigger pulmonary edema development in the lungs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120903143137.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple has delayed the launch of the HealthKit app platform, citing a bug. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Haitians receive the second dose of the vaccine against cholera as part of the UN's vaccination campaign. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins