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Nanomaterials in a heart beat: Nanomaterial may allow regeneration of cardiac cells

Date:
September 19, 2012
Source:
National University of Ireland, Galway
Summary:
Stem cell scientists have capitalized on the electrical properties of a widely used nanomaterial to develop cells which may allow the regeneration of cardiac cells.

Stem cell scientists have capitalised on the electrical properties of a widely used nanomaterial to develop cells which may allow the regeneration of cardiac cells. The breakthrough has been led by a team of scientists at the Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI) at the National University of Ireland Galway in conjunction with Trinity College Dublin.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in Ireland. Once damaged by heart attack, cardiac muscle has very little capacity for self-repair and at present there are no clinical treatments available to repair damaged cardiac muscle tissue.

Over the last 10 years, there has been tremendous interest in developing a cell-based therapy to address this problem. Since the use of a patient's own heart cells is not a viable clinical option, many researchers are working to try to find an alternative source of cells that could be used for cardiac tissue repair.

REMEDI researchers Dr Valerie Barron and Dr Mary Murphy have brought together a multi-disciplinary team of Irish materials scientists, physicists and biologists from REMEDI at National University of Ireland Galway and Trinity College Dublin to address this problem.

The researchers recognised that carbon nanotubes, a widely used nanoparticle, is reactive to electrical stimulation. They then used these nanomaterials to create cells with the characteristics of cardiac progenitors, a special type of cell found in the heart, from adult stem cells.

"The electrical properties of the nanomaterial triggered a response in the mesenchymal (adult) stem cells, which we sourced from human bone marrow. In effect, they became electrified, which made them morph into more cardiac-like cells," explains Valerie Barron of REMEDI at National University of Ireland Galway. "This is a totally new approach and provides a ready-source of tailored cells, which have the potential to be used as a new clinical therapy. Excitingly, this symbiotic strategy lays the foundation stone for other electroactive tissue repair applications, and can be readily exploited for other clinically challenging areas such as in the brain and the spinal cord."

This work has recently been published in two scientific journals, Biomaterials and Macromolecular Bioscience, and was carried out in collaboration with Professor Werner Blau, Investigator in CRANN and the School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin (TCD).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National University of Ireland, Galway. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Joseph N. Mackle, David J.-P. Blond, Emma Mooney, Caitlin McDonnell, Werner J. Blau, Georgina Shaw, Frank P. Barry, J. Mary Murphy, Valerie Barron. In vitro Characterization of an Electroactive Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanofiber Scaffold for Tissue Engineering. Macromolecular Bioscience, 2011; 11 (9): 1272 DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100029
  2. Emma Mooney, Joseph N. Mackle, David J.-P. Blond, Eoin O'Cearbhaill, Georgina Shaw, Werner J. Blau, Frank P. Barry, Valerie Barron, J. Mary Murphy. The electrical stimulation of carbon nanotubes to provide a cardiomimetic cue to MSCs. Biomaterials, 2012; 33 (26): 6132 DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.05.032

Cite This Page:

National University of Ireland, Galway. "Nanomaterials in a heart beat: Nanomaterial may allow regeneration of cardiac cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120919103315.htm>.
National University of Ireland, Galway. (2012, September 19). Nanomaterials in a heart beat: Nanomaterial may allow regeneration of cardiac cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120919103315.htm
National University of Ireland, Galway. "Nanomaterials in a heart beat: Nanomaterial may allow regeneration of cardiac cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120919103315.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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