Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mars: Curiosity's DAN instrument suggests Gale Crater drier than expected

Date:
September 28, 2012
Source:
Europlanet Media Centre
Summary:
Preliminary data from the Curiosity Mars Science Laboratory indicate that the Gale Crater landing site might be drier than expected. The Curiosity rover is designed to carry out research into whether Mars was ever able to support life, and a key element of this search is the hunt for water.Although Mars has many features on its surface that suggest a distant past in which the planet had abundant liquid water in the form of rivers and lakes, the only water known to be abundant on Mars today is frozen, embedded in the soil, and in large ice caps at both poles.

Detecting water on Mars using the DAN instrument The DAN instrument works by firing a pulse of neutrons at the ground beneath the Curiosity rover. If they hit hydrogen (as a component of water ice) the neutrons’ kinetic energy is significantly reduced, while other materials in the ground affect the neutrons far less.
Credit: Russian Federal Space Agency/NASA.JPL-Caltech

Preliminary data from the Curiosity Mars Science Laboratory, presented at the European Planetary Science Conference on 28 September, indicate that the Gale Crater landing site might be drier than expected.

Related Articles


The Curiosity rover is designed to carry out research into whether Mars was ever able to support life, and a key element of this search is the hunt for water. Although Mars has many features on its surface that suggest a distant past in which the planet had abundant liquid water in the form of rivers and lakes, the only water known to be abundant on Mars today is frozen, embedded in the soil, and in large ice caps at both poles.

The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on board Curiosity is designed to detect the location and abundance of water thanks to the way hydrogen (one of water's components) reflects neutrons. When neutrons hit heavy particles, they bounce off with little loss in energy, but when they hit hydrogen atoms (which are much lighter and have approximately the same mass as neutrons), they lose half of their energy.

The DAN instrument works by firing a pulse of neutrons at the ground beneath the rover and detecting the way it is reflected. The intensity of the reflection depends on the proportion of water in the ground, while the time the pulse takes to reach the detector is a function of the depth at which the water is located.

"The prediction based on previous measurements using the Mars Odyssey orbiter was that the soil in Gale Crater would be around 6% water. But the preliminary results from Curiosity show only a fraction of this," said Maxim Mokrousov (Russian Space Research Institute), the lead designer of the instrument.

One possible explanation of the discrepancy lies in the variability of water content across the surface of Mars. There are large-scale variations, with polar regions in particular having high abundances of water, but also substantial local differences even within individual regions on Mars.

The Mars Odyssey spacecraft is only able to measure water abundance for an area around 300 by 300 kilometres -- it cannot make high resolution maps. It may therefore be that Odyssey's figure for Gale Crater is an accurate (but somewhat misleading) average of significantly varying hydrogen abundances in different parts the crater.

Indeed, over the small distance that the rover has already covered, DAN has observed variations in the detector counting rates that may indicate different levels of hydrogen in the ground, hinting that this is likely to be the case.

Curiosity's ability to probe the water content in the martian soil in specific locations, rather than averages of broad regions, allows for a far more precise and detailed understanding of the distribution of water ice on Mars.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Europlanet Media Centre. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Europlanet Media Centre. "Mars: Curiosity's DAN instrument suggests Gale Crater drier than expected." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085214.htm>.
Europlanet Media Centre. (2012, September 28). Mars: Curiosity's DAN instrument suggests Gale Crater drier than expected. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085214.htm
Europlanet Media Centre. "Mars: Curiosity's DAN instrument suggests Gale Crater drier than expected." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085214.htm (accessed January 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Space & Time News

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Asteroid's Moon Spotted During Earth Flyby

Asteroid's Moon Spotted During Earth Flyby

Rumble (Jan. 27, 2015) Scientists working with NASA&apos;s Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California discovered an unexpected moon while observing asteroid 2004 BL86 during its recent flyby past Earth. Credit to &apos;NASA JPL&apos;. Video provided by Rumble
Powered by NewsLook.com
Water Fleas Prepare for Space Voyage

Water Fleas Prepare for Space Voyage

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) Scientists are preparing a group of water fleas for a unique voyage into space. The aquatic crustaceans, known as Daphnia, can be used as a miniature model for biomedical research, and their reproductive and swimming behaviour will be tested for signs of stress while on board the International Space Station. Jim Drury went to meet the team. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mars Rover Opportunity Celebrates 11-Year Anniversary

Mars Rover Opportunity Celebrates 11-Year Anniversary

Rumble (Jan. 26, 2015) Eleven years ago NASA&apos;s Opportunity rover touched down on Mars for what was only supposed to be a 90-day mission. Since then it has traveled 25.9 miles (41.7 kilometers), further than any other off-Earth surface vehicle has ever driven. Credit to &apos;NASA&apos;. Video provided by Rumble
Powered by NewsLook.com
NASA's On Course To Take Pluto's Best Photo Ever

NASA's On Course To Take Pluto's Best Photo Ever

Newsy (Jan. 25, 2015) NASA&apos;s New Horizons probe is en route to snap a picture of Pluto this summer, but making sure it doesn&apos;t miss its one chance to do so starts now. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins