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New material, graphene, may soon replace silicon for technology industry, experts say

Date:
September 28, 2012
Source:
The Research Council of Norway
Summary:
Researchers have now developed a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. There are hopes that this new ultra-thin material will revolutionize the technology industry within about 5 years.

Norwegian researchers are the world’s first to develop a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. This finding may revolutionize the technology industry.
Credit: Image courtesy of The Research Council of Norway

Norwegian researchers are the world's first to develop a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. This finding may revolutionise the technology industry.

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The method involves growing semiconductor-nanowires on graphene. To achieve this, researchers "bomb" the graphene surface with gallium atoms and arsenic molecules, thereby creating a network of minute nanowires.

The result is a one-micrometre thick hybrid material which acts as a semiconductor. By comparison, the silicon semiconductors in use today are several hundred times thicker. The semiconductors' ability to conduct electricity may be affected by temperature, light or the addition of other atoms.

Fantastic potential

Graphene is the thinnest material known, and at the same time one of the strongest. It consists of a single layer of carbon atoms and is both pliable and transparent. The material conducts electricity and heat very effectively. And perhaps most importantly, it is very inexpensive to produce.

"Given that it's possible to make semiconductors out of graphene instead of silicon, we can make semiconductor components that are both cheaper and more effective than the ones currently on the market," explains Helge Weman of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Dr Weman is behind the breakthrough discovery along with Professor Bjørn-Ove Fimland.

"A material comprising a pliable base that is also transparent opens up a world of opportunities, one we have barely touched the surface of," says Dr Weman. "This may bring about a revolution in the production of solar cells and LED components. Windows in traditional houses could double as solar panels or a TV screen. Mobile phone screens could be wrapped around the wrist like a watch. In short, the potential is tremendous."

The researchers have received assistance in gaining patents and founding a company from NTNU Technology Transfer AS, a collaborative partner to the programme entitled Commercialising R&D Results (FORNY2020) at the Research Council of Norway.

However, the path to these findings started with basic research funded under the Research Council's Clean Energy for the Future Programme (RENERGI) and the now-concluded programme, Nanotechnology and New Materials (NANOMAT), which initiated the findings.

The researchers will now begin to create prototypes directed towards specific areas of application. They have been in contact with giants in the electronics industry such as Samsung and IBM. "There is tremendous interest in producing semiconductors out of graphene, so it shouldn't be difficult to find collaborative partners," Dr Weman adds.

The researchers are hoping to have the new semiconductor hybrid materials on the commercial market in roughly five years.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Research Council of Norway. The original article was written by Bård Amundsen/Thomas Keilman. Translation: Glenn Wells/Carol B. Eckmann. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Research Council of Norway. "New material, graphene, may soon replace silicon for technology industry, experts say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085350.htm>.
The Research Council of Norway. (2012, September 28). New material, graphene, may soon replace silicon for technology industry, experts say. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085350.htm
The Research Council of Norway. "New material, graphene, may soon replace silicon for technology industry, experts say." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928085350.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

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