Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Active surveillance provides a viable alternative to surgery for small kidney masses, study suggests

Date:
October 17, 2012
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Active surveillance of small kidney masses is a safe and effective alternative to immediate surgery, with similar overall and cancer specific survival rates, according to a new study.

Active surveillance of small kidney masses is a safe and effective alternative to immediate surgery, with similar overall and cancer specific survival rates, according to a study published in the November issue of the urology journal BJUI.

The technique is primarily used to treat elderly patients who have complex health issues or decline surgery. But researchers from the Department of Urology at Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK, say that the results of their study suggest that active surveillance could safely be extended to other selected patients.

"The incidence of kidney cancer has been increasing in Europe and the USA since the 1980s and the use of more sophisticated imaging techniques means that smaller masses of less than 4cm are being picked up at earlier stages" says lead author Dr Nilay Patel.

"This has led to an increased rate of surgery for small kidney masses, but the benefits of this remain unclear. Conflicting reports on improvements in death rates for kidney cancer over the last few years suggest that increased detection may not necessarily be improving survival rates for patients with smaller tumours inside their kidney."

A total of 202 patients with 234 small renal masses of less than 4cms inside their kidney -- classified as T1a -- were identified.

Ninety were managed with partial nephrectomy (where only the diseased part of the kidney is removed), 41 with a radical nephrectomy (where the entire kidney is removed) and 71 with active surveillance (where patients are monitored for disease progression).

Key findings included:

  • Over a median follow-up of 34 months, the mean growth rate of the kidney masses in patients who were under active surveillance was 0.21cm. However, 53 per cent of the small renal masses in these patients showed negative or zero growth.
  • No statistically significant differences were observed in overall and cancer-specific survival rates for patients who were under active surveillance or received partial or radical nephrectomy.
  • The overall survival rates were 83 per cent for active surveillance, 80 per cent for radical nephrectomy and 90 per cent for partial nephrectomy.
  • The cancer specific survival rates were 99 per cent for active surveillance, 93 per cent for radical nephrectomy and 97 per cent for partial nephrectomy.

"Our research suggests that active surveillance of small kidney masses offers similar cancer outcomes to radical or partial surgery in the short and intermediate term" says Dr Patel.

"The results of this study support the need for a multicentre, prospective randomised trial to compare how active surveillance and surgery compare when it comes to managing such patients."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nilay Patel, David Cranston, M. Zeeshan Akhtar, Caroline George, Andrew Jones, Aaron Leiblich, Andrew Protheroe, Mark Sullivan. Active surveillance of small renal masses offers short-term oncological efficacy equivalent to radical and partial nephrectomy. BJU International, 2012; 110 (9): 1270 DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2012.11130.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Active surveillance provides a viable alternative to surgery for small kidney masses, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017091726.htm>.
Wiley. (2012, October 17). Active surveillance provides a viable alternative to surgery for small kidney masses, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017091726.htm
Wiley. "Active surveillance provides a viable alternative to surgery for small kidney masses, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017091726.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

How Mt. Everest Helped Scientists Research Diabetes

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) British researchers were able to use Mount Everest's low altitudes to study insulin resistance. They hope to find ways to treat diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Carpenter's Injury Leads To Hundreds Of 3-D-Printed Hands

Newsy (Apr. 14, 2014) Richard van As lost all fingers on his right hand in a woodworking accident. Now, he's used the incident to create a prosthetic to help hundreds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins