Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Compound's dual action inhibited oral cancer, rat study finds

Date:
October 18, 2012
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
Summary:
The compound licofelone inhibited oral cancer growth by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways, with no observable side effects, according to a recent rat study.

The compound licofelone inhibited oral cancer growth by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways, with no observable side effects, according to data from a rat study presented at the 11th Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Anaheim, Calif., Oct. 16-19, 2012.

Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to suppress oral and other cancers, but side effects, such as gastric bleeding, tend to disqualify them as preventive agents. Researchers hypothesized that suppressing COX might instigate cancer-causing inflammation through lipoxygenase (LOX). Because licofelone inhibits both pathways, researchers investigated whether it could provide superior cancer prevention while lowering toxicity.

"Toxicology is always a limitation because you're giving these preventive treatments to otherwise healthy people, so the threshold for toxicity is very low," said lead researcher David McCormick, Ph.D., senior vice president and director at the ITT Research Institute in Chicago. "Dual inhibitors may provide superior chemopreventive activity, as well as a better toxicologic profile."

Using a well-studied rat model, McCormick and colleagues induced oral cancer and tested different licofelone doses, including 37.5 mg/kg per day and 75 mg/kg per day, as well as 75 mg/kg per day after a six-week delay following the induction of cancer.

In a control group, 75 percent of rats developed squamous cell carcinoma, the predominant oral cancer in humans, most often at the base of the tongue. They also developed a variety of precancerous lesions.

Forty-three percent of rats assigned to high-dose licofelone and 55 percent assigned to the low-dose administration developed cancer. Those assigned to the compound after a six-week delay had a 34 percent incidence of oral cancer. McCormick noted that delayed administration can compromise the anticancer activity in some compounds. The fact that licofelone retained its anticancer action bodes well for its preventive potential, as patients may have already developed precancerous lesions before they seek treatment.

Researchers also observed a decreased incidence of the most advanced (highly invasive) cancers with licofelone: a 17 percent incidence with both doses compared with 54 percent in controls.

Although cancer incidence was reduced in the treated rats, the incidence of precursor lesions increased, again confirming licofelone's ability to suppress the development of oral cancer, according to the researchers.

"The data suggest the compound inhibits cancer progression," McCormick said. "The lower incidence of invasive cancer and higher incidence of cancer precursors indicate we may be stabilizing progression at the earlier, precancerous stage."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). "Compound's dual action inhibited oral cancer, rat study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018121954.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). (2012, October 18). Compound's dual action inhibited oral cancer, rat study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018121954.htm
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). "Compound's dual action inhibited oral cancer, rat study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018121954.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins