Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Prostate cancer prognosis hope

Date:
October 29, 2012
Source:
Manchester University
Summary:
Scientists have discovered a molecular ‘tell’ in laboratory experiments that could help doctors determine the severity of a patient’s prostate cancer.

Scientists have discovered a molecular 'tell' in laboratory experiments that could help doctors determine the severity of a patient's prostate cancer.

Cancer of the prostate -- the most common male cancer in the UK -- presents in two distinct ways: a low-risk type, which may never cause any symptoms, and a high-risk form that needs treatment to prevent it spreading to other parts of the body.

Knowing which type of prostate cancer each patient has -- some 40,000 British men per year -- is therefore essential to ensuring they receive the correct treatment.

Lead researcher Dr Angeliki Malliri, from the University of Manchester's Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, said: "Prognosis tells, or biomarkers, give doctors an indication of how a patient will fare after treatment. In prostate cancer, biomarkers that help differentiate between the low-risk and high-risk types of cancer are crucial to decide if and what type of treatment a patient needs."

The study, funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, identified the protein β2-syntrophin as a new prognosis marker for prostate cancer. The team, part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre (MCRC), discovered that the protein is involved in establishing tight connections between cells, which are crucial for holding them together to maintain tissue structure and prevent tumours from spreading.

Co-author Dr Natalie Mack said: "We showed that when β2-syntrophin is lost from these cell-to-cell connections, the cells become disorganised and this is what happens in cells from prostate cancer samples, potentially helping them to spread.

"Our findings indicate that the loss of β2-syntrophin at cell-to-cell connections in the prostate is an indicator of prostate cancer progression and patients with reduced levels of this protein at these cell-to-cell connections are more likely to have a recurrence of their cancer after treatment."

The authors say their results suggest that β2-syntrophin is a new prognosis marker in prostate cancer and that it should be further explored to distinguish between low- and high-risk level disease. Improved understanding and use of prognosis markers is essential to help guide clinical decisions and to ensure that patients get the best type of treatment for their type of cancer.

Dr Julie Sharp, senior science information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: "To treat prostate cancer more effectively, we need to understand more about how the disease develops and how to recognise more advanced types. This research provides another piece of the puzzle and further work will confirm whether this molecule could be useful in making better predictions about prostate cancer."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Manchester University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Natalie A. Mack, Andrew P. Porter, Helen J. Whalley, Juliane P. Schwarz, Richard C. Jones, Azharuddin Sajid Syed Khaja, Anders Bjartell, Kurt I. Anderson and Angeliki Malliri. β2-syntrophin and Par-3 promote an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at cell–cell junctions by differentially regulating Tiam1 activity. Nature Cell Biology, 2012 DOI: 10.1038/ncb2608

Cite This Page:

Manchester University. "Prostate cancer prognosis hope." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029093159.htm>.
Manchester University. (2012, October 29). Prostate cancer prognosis hope. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029093159.htm
Manchester University. "Prostate cancer prognosis hope." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029093159.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) A 111-year-old Japanese was certified as the world's oldest man by Guinness World Records on Wednesday. Sakari Momoi, a native of Fukushima in northern Japan, was given a certificate at a hospital in Tokyo. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins