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The ins and outs of in-groups and out-groups

Date:
November 1, 2012
Source:
Association for Psychological Science
Summary:
We humans organize ourselves in myriad kinds of social groups, from scout troops and sports teams to networks of colleagues and classmates. But how do these social groups work? How do we decide whom to trust and whom to follow? And how do we deal with people that don't fit the norms of our social groups? New research explores these issues by examining various facets of social perception and behavior.

We humans organize ourselves in myriad kinds of social groups, from scout troops and sports teams to networks of friends, colleagues, or classmates. But how do these social groups work? How do we decide whom to trust and whom to follow? And how do we deal with people that don't seem to fit the norms of our social groups?

New research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, explores these issues by examining various facets of social perception and behavior.

The Herding Hormone: Oxytocin Stimulates In-Group Conformity

People tend to conform to the behaviors of those they associate with, but not much is known about the mechanisms driving this. Psychological scientist Mirre Stallen of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at Radboud University and her colleagues investigated whether hormonal mechanisms might play a role. Specifically, they wondered whether the neuropeptide oxytocin -- known to facilitate prosocial behavior -- might be at work. Male participants were given a dose of the oxytocin or a placebo. They were then told that they would be divided into two groups to complete a task that involved rating the attractiveness of unfamiliar symbols. Before making their decisions, the participants could see the ratings of the other people inside and outside of their group. When the in-group and out-group members' ratings differed, participants given oxytocin conformed more closely to the in-group's scores. This conformity effect was not seen in the placebo group. Together, these findings suggest that oxytocin can influence subjective preferences and may stimulate individuals to conform to the behavior and beliefs of others in their group. Stallen and colleagues note that the finding that oxytocin stimulates conformity toward in-group members, but not out-group members, will help researchers to develop a more refined theory of the effects of oxytocin on social judgment and behavior.

Authors are: Mirre Stallen, Carsten K. W. De Dreu, Shaul Shalvi, Ale Smidts, and Alan G. Sanfey.

Treating Prejudice: An Exposure-Therapy Approach to Reducing Negative Reactions Toward Stigmatized Groups

Exposure therapy has been used to treat many types of phobias, but can it also be used to reduce prejudice against stigmatized groups? In three different experiments, psychological scientists Michèle Birtel and Richard Crisp examined whether a form of exposure therapy -- activating negative thoughts and feelings before introducing positive countervailing thoughts -- might be effective at reducing intergroup anxiety toward stigmatized groups (e.g., adults with schizophrenia, gay men, British Muslims). In each experiment, the researchers assigned participants to one of two groups: One group was asked to imagine two instances of positive contact with a person of the stigmatized group, while the other group was asked to imagine an instance of negative contact and an instance of positive contact with a person of the stigmatized group. Participants' intergroup anxiety and future contact intentions toward individuals in the stigmatized groups were then assessed. Taking the findings of the three experiments together, participants who first imagined a negative encounter and then a positive encounter reported lower intergroup anxiety and higher future-contact intentions than did participants who only imagined positive encounters. Birtel and Crisp conclude that "a small dose of negativity administered just prior to a positively focused intervention can be surprisingly effective in reducing prejudice toward stigmatized groups."

Authors are: Michèle D. Birtel and Richard J. Crisp.

The Stranger Effect: The Rejection of Affective Deviants

How do react to people who display unexpected emotional responses? Researcher Lauren Szczurek and colleagues at Stanford University asked participants to view a slideshow of positive, neutral, or negative images and a video of a viewer's responses to the images. In some cases, the viewer's responses matched up with the content of the video (e.g., positive emotional expressions in response to positive images), and in others, they were deviant. Interestingly, participants reported more negative judgments toward deviants who showed incongruent responses (e.g., positive emotional expressions to negative images) than toward deviants who showed flat expressions (e.g., no discernible emotional response). Participants reported preferring greater social distance from deviant viewers because they felt they shared fewer moral values with the deviant viewers. According to the researchers, these findings illustrate how subtle departures from what we consider to be "normative" affect can have significant and severe social consequences.

Authors are: Lauren Szczurek, Benoît Monin, and James J. Gross.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Association for Psychological Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. M. Stallen, C. K. W. De Dreu, S. Shalvi, A. Smidts, A. G. Sanfey. The Herding Hormone: Oxytocin Stimulates In-Group Conformity. Psychological Science, 2012; DOI: 10.1177/0956797612446026
  2. L. Szczurek, B. Monin, J. J. Gross. The Stranger Effect: The Rejection of Affective Deviants. Psychological Science, 2012; 23 (10): 1105 DOI: 10.1177/0956797612445314
  3. Michèle D. Birtel and Richard J. Crisp. Treating Prejudice: An Exposure-Therapy Approach to Reducing Negative Reactions Toward Stigmatized Groups. Psychological Science, September 18, 2012

Cite This Page:

Association for Psychological Science. "The ins and outs of in-groups and out-groups." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121101153555.htm>.
Association for Psychological Science. (2012, November 1). The ins and outs of in-groups and out-groups. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121101153555.htm
Association for Psychological Science. "The ins and outs of in-groups and out-groups." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121101153555.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

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