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Cold weather increases carbon monoxide dangers

Date:
November 12, 2012
Source:
Harris Health System
Summary:
With temperatures dropping and cold weather settling in, people will turn to gas furnaces, space heaters and fireplaces for warmth. Not so fast, caution pulmonologists from Harris Health System, who recommend that everyone get those devices checked for carbon monoxide leaks. Known as the silent killer, carbon monoxide is the gas byproduct of the incomplete combustion of fuel used in cars, gasoline engines, stoves, lanterns, burning charcoal or wood, gas ranges, fireplaces and heaters.

With temperatures dropping and cold weather settling in, people will turn to gas furnaces, space heaters and fireplaces for warmth. Not so fast, caution pulmonologists from Harris Health System, who recommend that everyone get those devices checked for carbon monoxide leaks.

Known as the silent killer, carbon monoxide is the gas byproduct of the incomplete combustion of fuel used in cars, gasoline engines, stoves, lanterns, burning charcoal or wood, gas ranges, fireplaces and heaters. The gas is colorless and odorless, but can be deadly.

"You can't see or smell carbon monoxide, but it can cause significant health issues and possibly kill you," says Dr. K. Guntupalli, chief, Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Section, Harris Health Ben Taub Hospital and professor, Baylor College of Medicine.

Carbon monoxide enters the bloodstream and robs the body of much-needed oxygen. While mild exposure can be easily treated, high or prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can be deadly.

Exposure symptoms:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Chest pain

High exposure affects:

  • Cardiovascular
  • Central nervous system
  • Lungs
  • Brain

Prolonged exposure causes:

  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Memory loss
  • Death

Annually, according the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 400 people nationwide die and 4,000 are hospitalized for carbon monoxide poisoning. About 20,000 people get sick enough to visit an emergency center. The most at risk are children, the elderly and those with chronic problems like heart disease, anemia and respiratory ailments.

If carbon monoxide poisoning is suspected, it's recommended that one leave the confined area and go outside for fresh air. Oxygen usually clears up most symptoms. For more severe cases, medical staff can administer concentrated oxygen treatments using face masks or pressurized hyperbaric chambers.

Dr. Nick Hanania, director, Asthma Clinical Research Center, Harris Health Ben Taub Hospital and associate professor, Baylor College of Medicine, cautions to never use gas-powered generators or charcoal grills indoors or use gas stove tops and ovens to stay warm. He recommends hiring a professional to inspect furnaces and fireplaces annually before using them. Another recommendation is installing a carbon monoxide detector, similar to a smoke detector.

"You could be creating carbon monoxide and not realize it until it's too late," he says. "The dangers of carbon monoxide are too great to ignore."

To confirm a case of carbon monoxide poisoning requires a blood test. However, Hanania suggests tracking any unexplained symptoms of headaches, nausea, vomiting or weakness while in a setting that seem to go away when out of that location.

"If several people in your house are having similar problems, then you should consider that it could be carbon monoxide poisoning and seek immediate medical attention," he says.

For more information on carbon monoxide poisoning, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at http://www.cdc.gov/co/faqs.htm


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Harris Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Harris Health System. "Cold weather increases carbon monoxide dangers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121112171217.htm>.
Harris Health System. (2012, November 12). Cold weather increases carbon monoxide dangers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121112171217.htm
Harris Health System. "Cold weather increases carbon monoxide dangers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121112171217.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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