Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Possible road map for improving healthcare

Date:
November 30, 2012
Source:
Intermountain Medical Center
Summary:
Given the right equipment, training and skill, an individual surgeon can expect to provide the best possible care on a consistent basis. But how do you get an entire system of surgeons -- each with his or her own ideas, backgrounds, and routines -- to provide that same level of care? New research shows that it's possible to improve care across the board if you tackle the problem in a standardized way, relying on the best evidence available.

Given the right equipment, training and skill, an individual surgeon can expect to provide the best possible care on a consistent basis. But how do you get an entire system of surgeons -- each with his or her own ideas, backgrounds, and routines -- to provide that same level of care?

A series of studies directed by Intermountain Healthcare's Oncology Clinical Program shows that it's possible to improve care across the board if you tackle the problem in a standardized way, relying on the best evidence available.

"It sounds simple, but it's really very difficult," said John C. Ruckdeschel, MD, Medical Director of Intermountain's Oncology Clinical Program. "We've shown that with the right approach, we can make meaningful improvements in patient care, even across a very large and complicated hospital system."

The Intermountain team will present their findings at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's first-ever Quality Care Symposium, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, in San Diego.

The Oncology Clinical Program launched a project to improve care for breast cancer patients at all of Intermountain Healthcare's 22 hospitals. The effort took aim at a common problem in medicine: variation. For example, if two identical patients seek treatment from two different physicians, they may get two entirely different treatment approaches and outcomes.

The Intermountain cancer research team did a thorough review of the best scientific literature and national guidelines, developed a clinical score card for physicians to follow and made sure the doctors had access to the right equipment and resources. They did not remove a physician's ability to make decisions about patient care, but rather provided the richest tools with which to make the decision.

Almost a decade after the project began, care has improved across the system. Two examples:

  • Breast Preservation. After the project fewer women had a breast removed, with 58 percent of women having a mastectomy in 1998, compared with 25 percent of women 10 years later.
  • Lymph Node Removal. Fewer women had invasive surgery to remove all lymph nodes under the arm, and instead had just one or two "sentinel" nodes examined to see if cancer had spread. Before the project began, about seven out of 10 women had sentinel node biopsy; after, the number rose to almost nine in 10.

The numbers show improvement for breast cancer patients, but the bigger picture means potentially better healthcare for everyone.

"This is the way medicine is moving today -- toward finding ways to apply the best science and provide appropriate treatment," said Dr. Ruckdeschel. "Intermountain Healthcare is doing this as well as, if not better than, anyone else in the country. Other institutions are looking to us for ways to make those improvements."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Intermountain Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Intermountain Medical Center. "Possible road map for improving healthcare." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110654.htm>.
Intermountain Medical Center. (2012, November 30). Possible road map for improving healthcare. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110654.htm
Intermountain Medical Center. "Possible road map for improving healthcare." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110654.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins