Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Security: Explosive breakthrough in research on molecular recognition

Date:
February 12, 2013
Source:
University of Alberta
Summary:
Ever wonder how sometimes people still get through security with explosives on their person? Research has revealed a new way to better detect molecules associated with explosive mixtures.

Ever wonder how sometimes people still get through security with explosives on their person? Research done in the University of Alberta's Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering has revealed a new way to better detect these molecules associated with explosive mixtures.

A team of researchers including post-doctoral fellows Seonghwan Kim, Dongkyu Lee and Xuchen Liu, with research associate Charles Van Neste, visiting professor, Sangmin Jeon from the Pohang University of Science and Technology (South Korea), and Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering professor Thomas Thundat, has found a method of using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy to increase recognition of chemical molecules in explosive mixtures.

Detecting trace amounts of explosives with mixed molecules presents a formidable challenge for sensors with chemical coatings. The nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy used by the Univesity of Alberta research team provides higher selectivity in molecular detection by measuring the photothermal effect of the absorbed molecules.

Thundat, who holds the Canadian Excellence Research Chair in Oil Sands Molecular Engineering, says the spectroscopy looks at the physical nature of the molecule and "even if there are mixed molecules, we can detect specific molecules using this method."

Seonghwan (Sam) Kim explained that conventional sensors based on coatings generally cannot detect specific molecules in complex mixtures if the concentration of interfering molecules is five times greater than the target molecules. The detection sensitivity and selectivity are drastically increased using the high-power infrared laser because the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of infrared photons and nonradiative decay processes. Using this method, a few trillionths of a gram of explosive molecules can now be detected in a complex mixture even if there is a higher concentration of other interfering molecules.

The research team's findings are published in Scientific Reports by Nature Publishing Group on January 23, 2013.

The research team's current work looks at detecting biomolecules and hydrocarbons in the oil industry and nerve gas stimulants (DMMP), which can be found in household radiators, gasoline, and fabric softeners, for example. The team also hopes to develop a hand-held device for chemical detection that could be utilized in fields such as security, health care and environmental protection.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alberta. The original article was written by Nicole Basaraba. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Seonghwan Kim, Dongkyu Lee, Xunchen Liu, Charles Van Neste, Sangmin Jeon, Thomas Thundat. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser. Scientific Reports, 2013; 3 DOI: 10.1038/srep01111

Cite This Page:

University of Alberta. "Security: Explosive breakthrough in research on molecular recognition." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130212154623.htm>.
University of Alberta. (2013, February 12). Security: Explosive breakthrough in research on molecular recognition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130212154623.htm
University of Alberta. "Security: Explosive breakthrough in research on molecular recognition." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130212154623.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 20, 2014) Forget rolling on rubber, could car drivers soon be traveling on tires made from dandelions? Teams of scientists are racing to breed a type of the yellow flower whose taproot has a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it. As Joanna Partridge reports, global tire makers are investing millions in research into a new tire source. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Scientists have developed a new device that mimics the way octopuses blend in with their surroundings to hide from dangerous predators. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) A solar cell that resembles a flower is offering a new take on green energy in Japan, where one scientist is searching for renewables that look good. Duration: 01:29 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins