Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Physical activity does not protect against in situ breast cancer, epidemiological study finds

Date:
February 28, 2013
Source:
Plataforma SINC
Summary:
Non-invasive or in situ breast cancer is characterized by the fact that it does not invade or does not multiply in other cells and unlike invasive breast cancer, it is not benefited by physical exercise. The experts suggest that exercise would only have protective effects once the tumour starts to invade the breast tissue. A European study has analyzed the association between physical activities and in situ or non-invasive breast cancer, or, in other words, cancer that has not yet invaded cells within or outside of the breast.

Non-invasive or in situ breast cancer is characterised by the fact that it does not invade or does not multiply in other cells and unlike invasive breast cancer, it is not benefited by physical exercise. The experts suggest that exercise would only have protective effects once the tumour starts to invade the breast tissue.

Related Articles


A European study published in the 'Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention' journal has analysed the association between physical activities and in situ or non-invasive breast cancer, or, in other words, cancer that has not yet invaded cells within or outside of the breast.

Headed by researchers from ten European countries including Spain, the work carried out under the framework of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) concludes that physical activity has no relation with the risk of developing this type of non-invasive cancer.

After more than eleven years following a European cohort of 283,927 women, 1,059 of whom had in situ cancer, the authors also found no association depending on exercise type.

In addition, the results did not vary between women of pre- and post-menopausal age or between obese and non-obese women. The same does not occur in the case of invasive cancer, where epidemiological studies have demonstrated that this factor is associated with a lesser risk.

"The aetiology (cause) of in situ breast cancer could be different to that of invasive breast cancer, or rather physical activity has a protective effect only in later stages of the carcinogenesis process. This would explain why no association has been found in non-invasive breast cancer," upholds María José Sánchez Pérez, Director of the Granada Cancer Registry and one of the authors of the study.

An in situ ductal carcinoma of the breast is the most frequent form of non-invasive breast cancer in women and is a risk factor or precursor for the development of invasive breast cancer. Therefore, the association between physical activity and this cancer would indicate that exercise could act as a protective factor in the early stages of the carcinogenesis process. However, it has been found that this is not the case.

Different results for invasive cancer

A previous study carried out on the same cohort investigated the association between physical activity and the risk of developing invasive breast cancer. It was discovered that physically active menopausal women have a 14% less chance of developing this cancer compared to their sedimentary menopausal counterparts.

The results revealed that moderate to intense physical activity in general decreases the risk of developing breast cancer by 8% and 14% respectively. This effect was similar for recreational physical activity and domestic chores.

In fact, in the expert report published by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) in 2007, as well as in its updated version in 2010, it was confirmed that there is enough evidence on the protective effects of physical activity but this evidence is somewhat more convincing in the case of menopausal women.

One of the most frequent of tumours

Breast cancer continues to be the most frequent of cancers amongst women living in developed countries. Despite experiencing a decrease over the last decade, its incidence still remains high due to the lifestyle of the population: reproduction patterns, diet, sedentary lifestyle, etc.

At present primary prevention constitutes the main approach in the attempt to reduce the incidence of this cancer. "Thanks to sufficient evidence, the risk factors associated with breast cancer are obesity in menopausal women and alcohol consumption, whereas physical activity and breastfeeding provide protection against the development of this cancer," concludes Sánchez.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Plataforma SINC. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. K. Steindorf, R. Ritte, A. Tjonneland, N. F. Johnsen, K. Overvad, J. N. Ostergaard, F. Clavel-Chapelon, A. Fournier, L. Dossus, A. Lukanova, J. Chang-Claude, H. Boeing, A. Wientzek, A. Trichopoulou, T. Karapetyan, D. Trichopoulos, G. Masala, V. Krogh, A. Mattiello, R. Tumino, S. Polidoro, J. R. Quiros, N. Travier, M.-J. Sanchez, C. Navarro, E. Ardanaz, P. Amiano, H. B. Bueno-de-Mesquita, F. J. B. van Duijnhoven, E. Monninkhof, A. M. May, K.-T. Khaw, N. Wareham, T. J. Key, R. C. Travis, K. B. Borch, V. Fedirko, S. Rinaldi, I. Romieu, P. A. Wark, T. Norat, E. Riboli, R. Kaaks. Prospective Study on Physical Activity and Risk of In Situ Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2012; 21 (12): 2209 DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0961
  2. Karen Steindorf, Rebecca Ritte, Piia-Piret Eomois, Annekatrin Lukanova, Anne Tjonneland, Nina Føns Johnsen, Kim Overvad, Jane Nautrup Østergaard, Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Agnès Fournier, Laure Dossus, Birgit Teucher, Sabine Rohrmann, Heiner Boeing, Angelika Wientzek, Antonia Trichopoulou, Tina Karapetyan, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Giovanna Masala, Franco Berrino, Amalia Mattiello, Rosario Tumino, Fulvio Ricceri, J.Ramón Quirós, Noémie Travier, María-José Sánchez, Carmen Navarro, Eva Ardanaz, Pilar Amiano, H.Bas. Bueno-de-Mesquita, Franzel van Duijnhoven, Evelyn Monninkhof, Anne M. May, Kay-Tee Khaw, Nick Wareham, Tim J. Key, Ruth C. Travis, Kristin Benjaminsen Borch, Malin Sund, Anne Andersson, Veronika Fedirko, Sabina Rinaldi, Isabelle Romieu, Jürgen Wahrendorf, Elio Riboli, Rudolf Kaaks. Physical activity and risk of breast cancer overall and by hormone receptor status: The European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 2013; 132 (7): 1667 DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27778

Cite This Page:

Plataforma SINC. "Physical activity does not protect against in situ breast cancer, epidemiological study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228093507.htm>.
Plataforma SINC. (2013, February 28). Physical activity does not protect against in situ breast cancer, epidemiological study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228093507.htm
Plataforma SINC. "Physical activity does not protect against in situ breast cancer, epidemiological study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228093507.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) — Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) — Following the closure of schools and universities in Guinea because of the Ebola virus, students look for temporary work or gather in makeshift classrooms to catch up on their syllabus. Duration: 02:14 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins