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Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits

Date:
March 12, 2013
Source:
Massachusetts General Hospital
Summary:
A new study finds that the health effects of weight gained after quitting smoking do not counteract the known cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation.

An analysis of data from the Framingham Offspring Study -- a long-term study that follows children of participants in the original Framingham Heart Study -- may have answered a question that has troubled individuals considering stopping smoking: do the health effects of any weight gained after quitting outweigh the known cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation? The report in the March 13 issue of JAMA concludes that the benefits of stopping smoking far exceed any weight-gain associated risk.

"Among people without diabetes, those who stopped smoking had a 50 percent reduction in the risk for heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death, and accounting for any weight increase didn't change that risk reduction," says James Meigs, MD, MPH, of the General Medicine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) senior author of the JAMA report. "In patients with diabetes -- among whom weight gain is a particular concern -- we saw the same pattern of a large risk reduction regardless of weight gained."

No study has previously investigated whether smoking-cessation-associated weight gain increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. One did look at the effects on risk factors such as blood pressure and lipid levels, but none have analyzed the actual occurence of cardiovascular events. Participants in the Framingham Offspring Study, which began in 1971, have a comprehensive medical exam and history taken every four to six years. The current investigation analyzed data from participant visits conducted from the mid 1980s into the mid-2000s, which covering the third to eighth visits for the overall study. The number of participants at each exam cycle ranged from almost 2,400 to about 3,250, totalling 11,148 individual person-exams.

Based on information gathered at each exam, participants were categorized as never smokers, current smokers, recent quitters -- who had stopped smoking since their last exam -- and long-term quitters. At the third study visit, 31 percent of participants were current smokers, and by the eighth visit only 13 percent continued to smoke. A general trend toward weight gain was seen across all study participants. Smokers, never smokers, and long-term quitters gained an average of 1 to 2 pounds between study visits, while recent quitters had gained an average of 5 to 10 pounds since their previous visit. But no matter how much weight they gained, the risk of cardiovascular events in the six years after quitting dropped in half for participants without diabetes. A similar drop in the incidence of cardiovascular events was seen in participants with diabetes, but it did not reach statistical significance, probably because less than 15 percent of the overall group was know to have diabetes.

"We now can say without question that stopping smoking has a very positive effect on cardiovascular risk for patients with and without diabetes, even if they experience the moderate weight gain seen in this study, which matches post-cessation weight increase reported in other studies," says Meigs, an associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Massachusetts General Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Carole Clair et al. Association of Smoking Cessation and Weight Change With Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults With and Without Diabetes. JAMA, 2013 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.1644
  2. Clair C, Rigotti NA, Porneala B, et al. Association of Smoking Cessation and Weight Change With Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults With and Without Diabetes. JAMA, 2013; 309 (10): 1014-1021 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.1644
  3. Fiore MC, Baker TB. Should Clinicians Encourage Smoking Cessation for Every Patient Who Smokes? JAMA, 2013; 309 (10): 1032-1033 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.1793

Cite This Page:

Massachusetts General Hospital. "Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312161201.htm>.
Massachusetts General Hospital. (2013, March 12). Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312161201.htm
Massachusetts General Hospital. "Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312161201.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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Regardless of Possible Weight Gain, Quitting Smoking Associated With Reduced Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Mar. 12, 2013 Among adults without diabetes, quitting smoking, compared with continuing smoking, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease despite subsequent weight gain, according to a new ... read more
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