Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low-dose aspirin stymies proliferation of two breast cancer lines

Date:
April 21, 2013
Source:
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
Summary:
Regular use of low-dose aspirin may prevent the progression of breast cancer, according to a new study.

Regular use of low-dose aspirin may prevent the progression of breast cancer, according to results of a study by researchers at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Kansas City, Mo., and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

The study found that aspirin slowed the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the lab and significantly reduced the growth of tumors in mice. The age-old headache remedy also exhibits the ability to prevent tumor cells from spreading.

The lead author of the study, Gargi Maity, a postdoctoral fellow who works in the cancer research unit at the VA Medical Center, will present the team's findings on Sunday, April 21, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which is being held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology 2013 conference in Boston. The senior author is Sushanta Banerjee, director of the cancer research unit and a professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.

The role of aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, in preventing and treating cancer has intrigued researchers since the late 1980s, when an Australian study found that people who regularly used aspirin were less likely to develop colorectal cancer. Aspirin use also has been shown to reduce the risk of squamous cell esophageal cancer and prostate cancer.

Anecdotal evidence indicated that breast cancer was less likely to return in women who took aspirin to lower their risk of heart attack or stroke. But the science behind this relationship is not well understood.

The VA study found that aspirin may interfere with cancer cells' ability to find an aggressive, more primordial state. In the mouse model the researchers used, cancer cells treated with aspirin formed no or only partial stem cells, which are believed to fuel the growth and spread of tumors.

Banerjee, a professor of medicine in division of hematology and oncology, says first-line chemotherapy treatments do not destroy stem cells. Eventually, the tumor will grow again. "If you don't target the stemness, it is known you will not get any effect," he says. "It will relapse."

In lab tests, aspirin blocked the proliferation of two different breast cancer lines. One of the lines tested is often called triple-negative breast cancer, a less common but more difficult treat form of the disease. "We are mainly interested in triple negative breast cancer, because the prognosis is very poor," Banerjee says.

Triple-negative breast cancers, which will be addressed in a special thematic program at the ASBMB annual meeting, lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone and Her2. Aspirin also may improve the effectiveness of current treatments for women whose breast cancers are hormone-receptor positive. In the team's study, aspirin enhanced the effect of tamoxifen, the usual drug therapy for hormone-receptor positive breast cancer.

Aspirin is used in the treatment of a number of different conditions. Banerjee says its ability to attack multiple metabolic pathways is what makes it potentially useful in the fight against cancer. "Cancer is not a single-gene disease," he says. "Multiple genes are involved."

Aspirin is a medicine with side effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Researchers will continue to explore if the positive effects of regular use of the drug outweigh the risks. In 2012, the National Cancer Institute asked scientists to design studies that would illuminate the mechanisms by which aspirin and drugs with other uses appear to reduce the risk of cancer or improve the prognosis for those diagnosed with the disease. Banerjee says his lab will apply for one of the grants.

Other co-authors at the cancer research unit include Snigdha Banerjee, associate professor of medicine in hematology and oncology at KU, and postdoctoral scholars Archana De and Amlan Das.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). "Low-dose aspirin stymies proliferation of two breast cancer lines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130421151610.htm>.
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). (2013, April 21). Low-dose aspirin stymies proliferation of two breast cancer lines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130421151610.htm
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). "Low-dose aspirin stymies proliferation of two breast cancer lines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130421151610.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins