Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mild blast injury causes molecular changes in brain akin to Alzheimer

Date:
April 24, 2013
Source:
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Summary:
Scientists have shown that mild traumatic brain injury after blast exposure produces inflammation, oxidative stress and gene activation patterns akin to disorders of memory processing such as Alzheimer's disease.

A multicenter study led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine shows that mild traumatic brain injury after blast exposure produces inflammation, oxidative stress and gene activation patterns akin to disorders of memory processing such as Alzheimer's disease.

Related Articles


Their findings were recently reported in the online version of the Journal of Neurotrauma.

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become an important issue in combat casualty care, said senior investigator Patrick Kochanek, M.D., professor and vice chair of critical care medicine and director of the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research at Pitt. In many cases of mild TBI, MRI scans and other conventional imaging technology do not show overt damage to the brain.

"Our research reveals that despite the lack of a lot of obvious neuronal death, there is a lot of molecular madness going on in the brain after a blast exposure," Dr. Kochanek said. "Even subtle injuries resulted in significant alterations of brain chemistry."

The research team developed a rat model to examine whether mild blast exposure in a device called a shock tube caused any changes in the brain even if there was no indication of direct cell death, such as bleeding. Brain tissues of rats exposed to blast and to a sham procedure were tested two and 24 hours after the injury.

Gene activity patterns, which shifted over time, resembled patterns seen in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's, Dr. Kochanek noted. Markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which reflects disruptions of cell signaling, were elevated, but there was no indication of energy failure that would be seen with poor tissue oxygenation.

"It appears that although the neurons don't die after a mild injury, they do sustain damage," he said. "It remains to be seen what multiple exposures, meaning repeat concussions, do to the brain over the long term."

Co-authors include researchers from the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; University of California, San Diego; ORA Inc., of Fredericksburg, Va.; Walter Reed Army Institute of ResearchDyn-FX Consulting Ltd, Amherstburg, ON; Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD; and Integrated Services Group, Inc., Potomac, MD.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Patrick M. Kochanek, C. Edward Dixon, David K. Shellington, Samuel S. Shin, Hulya Bayir, Edwin Jackson, Valerian Kagan, Hong Qu Yan, Peter V Swauger, Steven Parks, David V. Ritzel, Richard A Bauman, Robert Clark, Robert H. Garman, Faris Bandak, Geoffrey S.F. Ling, Larry W. Jenkins. Screening of Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Secondary Injury and Repair in the Brain after Experimental Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats. Journal of Neurotrauma, 2013; 130317122119004 DOI: 10.1089/neu.2013.2862

Cite This Page:

University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. "Mild blast injury causes molecular changes in brain akin to Alzheimer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130424103128.htm>.
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. (2013, April 24). Mild blast injury causes molecular changes in brain akin to Alzheimer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130424103128.htm
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. "Mild blast injury causes molecular changes in brain akin to Alzheimer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130424103128.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) A scandal involving bogus classes and inflated grades at the University of North Carolina was bigger than previously reported, a new investigation found. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Feast your eyes on this gorgeous family-friendly resort. Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Your Favorite Color Says About You

What Your Favorite Color Says About You

Buzz60 (Oct. 22, 2014) We all have one color we love to wear, and believe it or not, your color preference may reveal some of your character traits. In celebration of National Color Day, Krystin Goodwin (@kyrstingoodwin) highlights what your favorite colors may say about you. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins