Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Experimental drug inhibits growth in all stages of common kidney cancer

Date:
April 30, 2013
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Researchers have discovered a protein that is overly active in every human sample of kidney cancer they examined. They also found that an experimental drug designed to block the protein’s activity significantly reduced tumor growth in animals when used alone. Combining it with another drug already used to treat the cancer improved the effectiveness of both.

Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have discovered a protein that is overly active in every human sample of kidney cancer they examined. They also found that an experimental drug designed to block the protein’s activity significantly reduced tumor growth in animals when used alone. Combining it with another drug already used to treat the cancer improved the effectiveness of both.

The findings, reported in the April 30 online issue of Clinical Cancer Research, offer a much-needed potential new direction for the treatment of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which accounts for almost 85 percent of kidney cancer cases in the United States. More than 57,000 diagnoses of kidney cancer occur yearly in the U.S. with greater than 13,000 deaths.

“There is a clear need for new therapies for this common cancer. With very few exceptions, patients inevitably become resistant to all available treatments,” says the study’s senior investigator, molecular biologist JohnCopland, Ph.D.

Their findings might be relevant to the treatment of other cancers, says Christina von Roemeling, the study’s lead author. The protein they identified is produced by the stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) gene, which has also been found to be over active in a number of other cancers, including lung, stomach, breast, prostate, ovary and colon cancers.

“This is a gene that is highly active in a lot of other cancers and it may be that the agent we tested could provide new clinical avenues in those cancers as well,” von Roemeling says.

The experimental drug, A939572, is a targeted inhibitor of SCD1 protein. “We found it to be incredibly specific to cancer cells in laboratory mice treated with the agent,” Dr. Copland says. “But these are early days in the testing of this agent for cancer.”

Not only is SCD1 active in some cancers, it also is being investigated for its role in promoting obesity and diabetes, the researchers say. Scientists are also testing A939572 as an antidote to those conditions.

The Mayo Clinic scientists performed a genome screen of tissue samples from 150 kidney cancer patient tissue samples, which represented all stages of cancer progression, to identify genes that are significantly overexpressed, compared to noncancerous tissue samples. SCD1 was one of their top finds.

They then disabled SCD1 in laboratory kidney cancer cells and found that the tumor cells stopped growing and a large percentage died.

Next, researchers tested A939572 and the federally approved kidney cancer drug temsirolimus. They found that using either agent alone cut tumor growth by up to 25 percent in mice studies, but using both drugs together, and at lower doses, reduced it 60 to 70 percent.

“The synergy between the drugs was very striking, suggestive of significant clinical benefit in patients,” Dr. Copland says.

Von Roemeling says that SCD1 protein expression offers a novel molecular prognostic biomarker in kidney cancer that could guide therapy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Christina A. von Roemeling, Laura A. Marlow, Johnny J. Wei, Simon J. Cooper, Thomas R. Caulfield, Kevin Wu, Winston W. Tan, Han W. Tun, and John A. Copland. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase 1 Is a Novel Molecular Therapeutic Target for Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma. Clin Cancer Res, May 1, 2013 DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-3249

Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Experimental drug inhibits growth in all stages of common kidney cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430092428.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2013, April 30). Experimental drug inhibits growth in all stages of common kidney cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430092428.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Experimental drug inhibits growth in all stages of common kidney cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430092428.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins