Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Increased risk of heart attack and death with progressive coronary artery calcium buildup

Date:
May 2, 2013
Source:
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)
Summary:
Patients with increasing buildups of coronary artery calcium face a six-fold increase in risk of heart attack or death from heart disease.

Patients with increasing accumulations of coronary artery calcium were more than six times more likely to suffer from a heart attack or die from heart disease than patients who didn't have increasing accumulations, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The study, conducted at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) and five other sites, suggests more frequent monitoring of patients with coronary artery calcium accumulations could help determine the risk of heart attacks and give those patients time to make changes to reduce the risk.

For the study, researchers measured the coronary artery calcium in a diverse group of 6,778 persons aged 45 to 84 years from the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) study. The participants had no history of coronary heart disease prior to enrolling the MESA study.

Researchers found that nearly half (49.9%) of the participants had coronary artery calcium in their initial scans -- and most of them (84.8%) continued to accumulate coronary artery calcium, as measured in subsequent CT (computed tomography) scans approximately 2.5 years later. For those with the greatest increase in coronary artery calcium buildup (300 units or more), the study found a more than six-fold increase in coronary heart disease incidents independent of other risk factors for heart disease.

"We have known that coronary artery calcium can be related to heart disease, but this study shows the progression of the accumulation of the calcium in the arteries can be a significant factor in evaluating the risk that a patient may suffer a heart attack in the future," said Matthew Budoff, MD, the primary author of the study and an LA BioMed principal investigator and director of Cardiac CT. "By conducting serial CT scans, we may be able to identify people at high risk of a heart attack and intervene to prevent that heart attack through new therapies, lifestyle changes and other modifications. Further study is needed to determine if more frequent CT scans would be a cost-effective approach to reducing coronary heart disease, the No. 1 cause of death for both men and women in the U.S."

About 600,000 people in the U.S. die of heart disease every year, and coronary heart disease costs the country nearly $109 billion annually, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CT scans can look for specks of calcium, or calcifications, in the walls of the coronary arteries to detect early signs of coronary heart disease, which is caused by the buildup of plaque, a waxy substance in the coronary arteries. Coronary heart disease can lead to heart attacks, heart failure and arrhythmias, which are problems with the rate or rhythm of the heart.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jamal S. Rana, Michael Pencina, Michael Blaha, Roger Blumenthal, Arthur Agatston, James K. Min, Ron Blankstein, Nathan D. Wong, Joao Lima, Leslee J. Shaw, Mathew J. Budoff, Mary Cushman, Daniel Berman, Khurram Nasir. CORONARY ARTERY CALCIUM SCORE VERSUS A MULTIPLE BIOMARKER APPROACH FOR CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK ASSESSMENT: MULTI-ETHNIC STUDY OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2013; 61 (10): E812 DOI: 10.1016/S0735-1097(13)60812-8

Cite This Page:

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). "Increased risk of heart attack and death with progressive coronary artery calcium buildup." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130502142657.htm>.
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). (2013, May 2). Increased risk of heart attack and death with progressive coronary artery calcium buildup. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130502142657.htm
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). "Increased risk of heart attack and death with progressive coronary artery calcium buildup." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130502142657.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins