Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

DNA flaws may contribute to cancer risk in people with type 2 diabetes

Date:
July 14, 2013
Source:
Imperial College London
Summary:
A type of genetic abnormality linked to cancer is more common in people with type 2 diabetes than the rest of the population, a new study has found.

A type of genetic abnormality linked to cancer is more common in people with type 2 diabetes than the rest of the population, a new study has found.

People with type 2 diabetes are already known to have a higher risk of cancers, especially blood cancers like lymphoma and leukaemia. The new study, led by scientists at Imperial College London and CNRS in France, suggests that mutations called clonal mosaic events (CMEs) may partly explain why this is.

CMEs are defects that result in some cells having extra copies or missing copies of large chunks of DNA. They are very rare in young people but more common as we get older. Among those aged over 70, around one in 50 people have some of these mutations. Research published last year found that people with CMEs have a 10-fold higher risk of blood cancers.

In the new study, published in Nature Genetics, researchers looked for CMEs in blood samples from 7,437 participants in genetic studies in Europe, including 2,208 people with type 2 diabetes. They found that CMEs were four times more common in people with type 2 diabetes.

“Type 2 diabetes is a disease that accelerates ageing, so we wondered if it would make people more likely to have these genetic defects that are associated with ageing,” said Professor Philippe Froguel, from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, who led the study.

“This finding may partly explain why people with type 2 diabetes are more likely to get blood cancers. It could have profound clinical implications. It may be useful for doctors to test for CMEs in patients with type 2 diabetes to identify those who have the highest risk of cancers. These patients would be followed up closely to watch for early signs of leukaemia and could start having mild chemotherapy.”

They also found that diabetes patients with CMEs had a much higher rate of complications such as kidney failure, eye disease or heart disease.

The study was supported by the Contrat de Projets Etat–Région Nord-Pas-De-Calais, the Délégation Régionale à la Recherche et à la Technologie de la Région Nord-Pas-De-Calais, the European Union and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Imperial College London. The original article was written by Sam Wong. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Amélie Bonnefond, Boris Skrobek, Stéphane Lobbens, Elodie Eury, Dorothée Thuillier, Stéphane Cauchi, Olivier Lantieri, Beverley Balkau, Elio Riboli, Michel Marre, Guillaume Charpentier, Loïc Yengo, Philippe Froguel. Association between large detectable clonal mosaicism and type 2 diabetes with vascular complications. Nature Genetics, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/ng.2700

Cite This Page:

Imperial College London. "DNA flaws may contribute to cancer risk in people with type 2 diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130714160601.htm>.
Imperial College London. (2013, July 14). DNA flaws may contribute to cancer risk in people with type 2 diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130714160601.htm
Imperial College London. "DNA flaws may contribute to cancer risk in people with type 2 diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130714160601.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins