Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Consumer satisfaction an indicator of quality of care in nursing homes

Date:
August 5, 2013
Source:
University of Rochester Medical Center
Summary:
Consumer satisfaction surveys of nursing home residents and their families track closely with other quality of care measures. These results indicate that the surveys could be a valuable tool to both inform consumer choice and reward homes for quality of care.

Consumer satisfaction surveys of nursing home residents and their families track closely with other quality of care measures. These results, which were published in the journal Health Affairs, indicate that the surveys could be a valuable tool to both inform consumer choice and reward homes for quality of care.

Related Articles


"Satisfaction scores are clearly an important indicator of the quality of care in nursing homes," said Yue Li, Ph.D., an associate professor in the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Department of Public Health Sciences and lead author of the study. "When used with other quality of care indicators, these assessments have great potential to empower consumers to make choices, incent improvements by nursing homes, and inform pay-for-performance."

In 2002, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began to make publically available quality report cards for all certified nursing homes. These reports included clinically-oriented performance measures such as staffing levels, citations, and patient outcomes.

In 2005, six states, including Massachusetts, launched projects to evaluate consumer satisfaction with nursing homes. Nursing home residents and their families were asked to fill out a survey that asked them to grade overall satisfaction and whether or not they would recommend the home to a friend. The questionnaire also asked respondents to provide satisfaction scores in several specific areas, such as staffing and administration, the home's physical environment, activities offered, their personal care, meals, and personal rights.

CMS is considering expanding the state satisfaction surveys to the national level, a step that the authors believe could have significant policy implications in terms of how nursing homes are compensated for care. This financial incentive coupled with informed consumers should compel nursing homes to improve or maintain a high level of care.

Using data from 2005, 2007, and 2009, Li and his colleagues reviewed the survey results for Massachusetts nursing homes. They found that while overall satisfaction was consistently high, certain areas such as physical and social activities and meals met less satisfaction.

There was also significant variation in scores with 25 percent of homes received scores of "less than satisfactory." Nursing homes with higher scores also tended to have higher staffing levels and fewer citations for deficiencies, an indication that the satisfaction scores correlated with quality of care. Additionally, non-profit and government owned nursing homes scored higher compared to their for-profit counterparts.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Rochester Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Y. Li, X. Cai, Z. Ye, L. G. Glance, C. Harrington, D. B. Mukamel. Satisfaction With Massachusetts Nursing Home Care Was Generally High During 2005-09, With Some Variability Across Facilities. Health Affairs, 2013; 32 (8): 1416 DOI: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1416

Cite This Page:

University of Rochester Medical Center. "Consumer satisfaction an indicator of quality of care in nursing homes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130805223309.htm>.
University of Rochester Medical Center. (2013, August 5). Consumer satisfaction an indicator of quality of care in nursing homes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130805223309.htm
University of Rochester Medical Center. "Consumer satisfaction an indicator of quality of care in nursing homes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130805223309.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins