Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A summer in the country can inspire physicians to practice in rural areas

Date:
August 6, 2013
Source:
University of Missouri-Columbia
Summary:
A 15-year study shows medical school graduates involved in a rural pipeline program not only entered family practice residency training at higher rates than non-participants, but nearly half began their medical careers in rural locations.

The Summer Community Program is part of MU's Rural Track Pipeline Program, which places students in rural communities for part of their medical training.
Credit: University of Missouri School of Medicine

According to a recent study, the Summer Community Program offered by the University of Missouri School of Medicine has made a significant impact on physician access in rural communities. The 15-year study showed medical school graduates involved in the program not only entered family practice residency training at higher rates than nonparticipants, but nearly half began their medical careers in rural locations.

"In the United States, only about 10 percent of physicians practice in rural areas, and less than 3 percent of entering medical students nationally plan to practice in a rural community or small town," said Kevin Kane, MD, a professor of family and community medicine at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "We developed the Summer Community Program in 1995 to address this issue. The outcome of our study shows that not only is our program working here in Missouri, but replicating it throughout the country may increase interest in rural medicine and address rural physician workforce needs elsewhere."

The Summer Community Program is part of the MU School of Medicine's Rural Track Pipeline Program. It provides students with four to eight weeks of clinical training in a rural community during the summer between their first two years of medical school. The program accepts 20 to 30 participants each year.

In the study, researchers questioned 229 participants from 1996 to 2010, and asked them about pre- and post-program perceptions related to rural practice and lifestyle. The researchers then calculated how many chose to become family medicine physicians, and tracked the locations of their first practices.

The findings indicated that student perceptions concerning rural practice and lifestyle changed favorably, with 72 percent agreeing they were more interested in rural medicine than they were before. Compared to nonparticipants, those involved in the summer program were also 30 percent more likely to enter primary care residency training, and twice as likely to choose family medicine specifically. Of the participants, 46 percent chose rural settings for their first practice locations following their postgraduate training.

"Early rural clinical training experiences can have a positive influence on the students' interest and perception of rural medicine and lifestyle," said Kathleen Quinn, PhD, assistant professor of family and community medicine at the MU School of Medicine and co-author of the study. "For those who show an interest or may be on the fence about practicing in a rural community, giving them this real-world experience has been a factor in that decision-making process."

John Krumme, a fourth-year MU School of Medicine student completing a rotation in orthopaedic surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, is considering a rural practice after his involvement with the Summer Community Program.

"I feel that practicing in a small town is a real possibility for me," Krumme said. "I have always been interested in sports medicine, but I did not consider practicing in small communities before going through the program because I didn't think they could sustain a specialty like that. Having had that experience, I am definitely considering it now."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kevin Y. Kane, Kathleen J. Quinn, James J. Stevermer, Jana L. Porter, Weldon D. Webb, Harold A. Williamson, Julie Burdin. Summer in the Country. Academic Medicine, 2013; 88 (8): 1157 DOI: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318299fb5d

Cite This Page:

University of Missouri-Columbia. "A summer in the country can inspire physicians to practice in rural areas." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130806145529.htm>.
University of Missouri-Columbia. (2013, August 6). A summer in the country can inspire physicians to practice in rural areas. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130806145529.htm
University of Missouri-Columbia. "A summer in the country can inspire physicians to practice in rural areas." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130806145529.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Science & Society News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) A scandal involving bogus classes and inflated grades at the University of North Carolina was bigger than previously reported, a new investigation found. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins