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Who benefits from vitamin D?

Date:
August 13, 2013
Source:
University of Eastern Finland
Summary:
Studying the expression of genes that are dependent on vitamin D makes it possible to identify individuals who will benefit from vitamin D supplementation, shows a new study. Population-based studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for chronic diseases and weaken the body’s immune system.

Studying the expression of genes that are dependent on vitamin D makes it possible to identify individuals who will benefit from vitamin D supplementation, shows a University of Eastern Finland study published recently in PLoS One.

Population-based studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for chronic diseases and weaken the body's immune system. In the present study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, the study participants were given a daily dose of either 40 or 80 micrograms of vitamin D, or a placebo, over a course of 5 months during Finnish winter.. The results showed that the expression of vitamin D dependent genes in adipose tissue and monocytes, i.e. white blood cells, correlated only in half of the study participants with their vitamin D concentrations in the blood.

The researchers concluded that persons whose expression of the CD14 and thrombomodulin genes was not altered as a result of vitamin D supplementation already had a sufficiently high serum vitamin D concentration or their utilization of vitamin D was disturbed, which calls for further study. The researchers believe that studying the expression of vitamin D dependent genes in tissues is a novel way to identify individuals who might benefit from long-term vitamin D supplementation. This observation is further supported by the fact that studying alterations in the expression of genes also made it possible to identify persons whose levels of interleukin 6, an inflammation marker, were reduced as their serum vitamin D levels increased.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Eastern Finland. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Carsten Carlberg, Sabine Seuter, Vanessa D. F. de Mello, Ursula Schwab, Sari Voutilainen, Kari Pulkki, Tarja Nurmi, Jyrki Virtanen, Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen, Matti Uusitupa. Primary Vitamin D Target Genes Allow a Categorization of Possible Benefits of Vitamin D3 Supplementation. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (7): e71042 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071042

Cite This Page:

University of Eastern Finland. "Who benefits from vitamin D?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101005.htm>.
University of Eastern Finland. (2013, August 13). Who benefits from vitamin D?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101005.htm
University of Eastern Finland. "Who benefits from vitamin D?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101005.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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