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Magnetic jet shows how stars begin their final transformation

Date:
September 16, 2013
Source:
Royal Astronomical Society (RAS)
Summary:
Astronomers have for the first time found a jet of high-energy particles emanating from a dying star. The discovery is a crucial step in explaining how some of the most beautiful objects in space are formed -- and what happens when stars like the sun reach the end of their lives.

Two older objects, the Calabash nebula (a proto-planetary nebula) and M 2-9 (a young planetary nebula) show how IRAS 15445-5449 (left panel) may evolve in the future. The white bar indicates 0.5 light year.
Credit: E. Lagadec/ESO/A. Pérez Sánchez; NASA/ESA & Valentin Bujarrabal; B. Balick, V. Icke, G. Mellema and NASA/ESA

An international team of astronomers has for the first time found a jet of high-energy particles emanating from a dying star. The discovery, by a collaboration of scientists from Sweden, Germany and Australia, is a crucial step in explaining how some of the most beautiful objects in space are formed -- and what happens when stars like the sun reach the end of their lives.

The researchers publish their results in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

At the end of their lives, stars like the sun transform into some of the most beautiful objects in space: amazing symmetric clouds of gas called planetary nebulae. But how planetary nebulae get their strange shapes has long been a mystery to astronomers.

Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have together with colleagues from Germany and Australia discovered what could be the key to the answer: a high-speed, magnetic jet from a dying star.

Using the CSIRO Australia Telescope Compact Array, an array of six 22-metre radio telescopes in New South Wales, Australia, they studied a star at the end of its life. The star, known as IRAS 15445−5449, is in the process of becoming a planetary nebula, and lies 23,000 light years away in the southern constellation Triangulum Australe (the Southern Triangle).

"In our data we found the clear signature of a narrow and extremely energetic jet of a type which has never been seen before in an old, sun-like star," says Andrés Pérez Sánchez, graduate student in astronomy at Bonn University, who led the study.

The strength of the radio waves of different frequencies from the star match the expected signature for a jet of high-energy particles which are, thanks to strong magnetic fields, accelerated up to speeds close to the speed of light. Similar jets have been seen in many other types of astronomical object, from newborn stars to supermassive black holes.

"What we're seeing is a powerful jet of particles spiralling through a strong magnetic field," says Wouter Vlemmings, astronomer at Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers. "Its brightness indicates that it's in the process of creating a symmetric nebula around the star."

Right now the star is going through a short but dramatic phase in its development, the scientists believe.

"The radio signal from the jet varies in a way that means that it may only last a few decades. Over the course of just a few hundred years the jet can determine how the nebula will look when it finally gets lit up by the star," says team member Jessica Chapman, astronomer at CSIRO in Sydney, Australia.

The scientists don't yet know enough, though, to say whether our sun will create a jet when it dies. "The star may have an unseen companion -- another star or large planet -- that helps create the jet. With the help of other front-line radio telescopes, like ALMA, and future facilities like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), we'll be able to find out just which stars create jets like this one, and how they do it," says Andrés Pérez Sánchez.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. F. Pérez-Sánchez, W. H. T. Vlemmings, D. Tafoya, and J. M. Chapman. A synchrotron jet from a post-asymptotic giant branch star. MNRAS, September 15, 2013 DOI: 10.1093/mnrasl/slt117

Cite This Page:

Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). "Magnetic jet shows how stars begin their final transformation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916090836.htm>.
Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). (2013, September 16). Magnetic jet shows how stars begin their final transformation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916090836.htm
Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). "Magnetic jet shows how stars begin their final transformation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916090836.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

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