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New kit predicts most common lung cancer survival

Date:
October 25, 2013
Source:
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Summary:
This genetic test newly developed to predict lung cancer survival has the potential to enhance patients' quality of life for those who have a good prognosis by avoiding chemotherapy, as well as being a cost saving for hospitals.

This new method 'in vitro' predicts the survival of the most common lung cancer, the adenocarcinoma, with a higher probability than the existing clinical methods.
Credit: Universidad Politécnica de Madrid

This genetic test is the result of a joint research of Computational Intelligence Group of the Department of Artificial Intelligence of the UPM with the Molecular Oncology Unit of the CIEMAT. This test would enhance patients' quality of life for those who have a good prognosis by avoiding chemotherapy as well as being a cost saving for hospitals.

It is a genomic-clinical method able to determinate the prognosis of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma by studying the expression levels of 30 genes and combining the results with other indicators such as age, gender or the stage of the tumor. From this study, patients are classified into phases and from this classification depends their prognosis and treatment.

Although, there are clinical-pathological features that predict with accuracy the survival in patients, there are tumors with specific features that have diverse behaviors and, in these cases, the new method increases the predictions of the prognosis more significantly.

Lung cancer causes the most cancer deaths in males and females globally. The most common subtype is the adenocarcinoma cancer which represents the 40% of the total. In this way, the patented method could be useful for Oncology Services in hospitals. Therefore, the method will allow us to know with accuracy the survival probability after suffering an adenocarcionma and then, to apply the best treatment what would enhance the survival and patients' quality of life.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. "New kit predicts most common lung cancer survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131025091818.htm>.
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. (2013, October 25). New kit predicts most common lung cancer survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131025091818.htm
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. "New kit predicts most common lung cancer survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131025091818.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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