Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New drug to help common bowel disease

Date:
October 29, 2013
Source:
University of Adelaide
Summary:
An international team has identified the mechanism of pain relief of a new drug for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation, based on nonclinical studies, and quantified its effectiveness in pain relief in human trials.

An international team led by University of Adelaide researchers has identified the mechanism of pain relief of a new drug for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C), based on nonclinical studies, and quantified its effectiveness in pain relief in human trials.

Published in the journal Gastroenterology, the study describes the pain mechanism of action for Linaclotide, a recently approved drug for the treatment of chronic abdominal pain and constipation in adult IBS-C patients.

IBS is a potentially debilitating condition with abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation. It affects up to 15% of western populations, costing millions of dollars annually in Australia alone in lost productivity and health care. Approximately one third of IBS patients are diagnosed as having IBS-C.

"This is a significant finding and very good news for IBS-C sufferers," says study leader Dr Stuart Brierley, NHMRC RD Wright Biomedical Fellow in the University's Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory. "IBS affects many people, particularly women, on a daily basis and has a significant impact on their quality of life. Abdominal pain is often the most troubling symptom to IBS patients and has been the most difficult symptom to treat.

"The drug is effective in relieving abdominal pain associated with IBS-C and is already available and registered for use by IBS-C patients in the USA and Europe. It is yet to go through the regulatory process in Australia."

The research is a collaboration between the Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory, (University of Adelaide) and Ironwood Pharmaceuticals Inc, the developers of Linaclotide. Linaclotide is a new class of medicine and is the only treatment for IBS-C currently registered with the European Medicines Agency; it is also the first prescription treatment available in over six years for adults with IBS-C in the US.

Linaclotide binds the receptor domain of guanylate cyclase-C on the inner lining of the intestines. It is marketed by Ironwood and Forest Laboratories Inc as Linzess® in the US and by Ironwood and Almirall SA as Constella® in Europe. Ironwood has partnerships through which it is conducting clinical trials of Linaclotide in China and Japan. Ironwood is exploring partnership opportunities for advancing Linaclotide in unpartnered territories, including Australia and New Zealand.

Dr Brierley, in the Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory, collaborated with Ironwood to further investigate how Linaclotide acts within the gastrointestinal tract to reduce abdominal pain. It had been shown to increase the secretion of fluids into the intestine and improve transit through the gastrointestinal tract. However, initial trials had shown that it also reduced abdominal pain associated with IBS-C, independently of its action on improving constipation.

Pre-clinical studies by the Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory showed that Linaclotide inhibits pain nerve endings in the intestine through a novel physiological pathway localised to the gastrointestinal tract. "The study also showed the analgesic effect translated into clinical findings in humans," says Dr Brierley. "IBS-C patients given the drug orally showed significant improvement in abdominal pain over those given placebo during a 26-week trial."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joel Castro, Andrea M. Harrington, Patrick A. Hughes, Christopher M. Martin, Pei Ge, Courtney M. Shea, Hong Jin, Sarah Jacobson, Gerhard Hannig, Elizabeth Mann, Mitchell B. Cohen, James E. Macdougall, Bernard J. Lavins, Caroline B. Kurtz, Inmaculada Silos-Santiago, Jeffrey M. Johnston, Mark G. Currie, L. Ashley Blackshaw, Stuart M. Brierley. Linaclotide Inhibits Colonic Nociceptors and Relieves Abdominal Pain via Guanylate Cyclase-C and Extracellular Cyclic Guanosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate. Gastroenterology, 2013; DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.08.017

Cite This Page:

University of Adelaide. "New drug to help common bowel disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029092047.htm>.
University of Adelaide. (2013, October 29). New drug to help common bowel disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029092047.htm
University of Adelaide. "New drug to help common bowel disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029092047.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) — A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins