Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Little difference found between self-reported, measured weights following bariatric surgery

Date:
November 4, 2013
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
In an analysis that included nearly 1,000 patients, self-reported weights following bariatric surgery were close to measured weights, suggesting that self-reported weights used in studies are accurate enough to be used when measured weights are not available.

In an analysis that included nearly 1,000 patients, self-reported weights following bariatric surgery were close to measured weights, suggesting that self-reported weights used in studies are accurate enough to be used when measured weights are not available, according to a Research Letter published online by JAMA.

Related Articles


"Obtaining standardized weights in long-term studies can be difficult. Self-reported weights are more easily obtained, but less accurate than those from a calibrated scale and may be inaccurately reported," according to background information in the article.

Nicholas J. Christian, Ph.D., of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, and colleagues investigated whether self-reported weights following bariatric surgery differed from weights obtained by study personnel using a standard scale. They used data collected between April 2010 and November 2012 at annual assessments from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2, an observational cohort study of 2,458 adults undergoing an initial Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), or other bariatric procedure at 10 centers. Participants were sent mailed questionnaires each year and asked to report their: (1) weight from last medical office or weight loss program visit (self-reported medical weight) and (2) last self-weighing (self-reported personal weight).

The final analysis included 988 participants, including 164 with a self-reported medical weight, 580 with a self-reported personal weight, and 244 with both self-reported weights. Across the 2 groups who self-reported weight, women and men underreported their weight by an average 2.2 lbs. or less and the degree of underreporting was not different between women and men. Self-reported medical weights were closer to measured weights than were self-reported personal weights for both women and men.

"Small differences between self-reported and measured weights were found and may be due to differences in clothing, inaccurate personal scales, time between measurements, or intentional misrepresentation," the authors write. "Self-reported weights after bariatric surgery may be more accurate because participants who undergo surgery to lose weight may be especially attentive to their weight."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nicholas J. Christian, PhD; Wendy C. King, PhD; Susan Z. Yanovski, MD; Anita P. Courcoulas, MD, MPH; Steven H. Belle, PhD, MScHyg. Validity of Self-reported Weights Following Bariatric Surgery. JAMA, November 2013

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Little difference found between self-reported, measured weights following bariatric surgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104112639.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2013, November 4). Little difference found between self-reported, measured weights following bariatric surgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104112639.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Little difference found between self-reported, measured weights following bariatric surgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104112639.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) The World Health Organizations says TB numbers rose in 2013, but it's partly due to better detection and more survivors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins