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New evidence on biological basis of highly impulsive, aggressive behaviors

Date:
November 10, 2013
Source:
Society for Neuroscience
Summary:
Physical and chemical changes in the brain during development can potentially play a role in some delinquent and deviant behaviors, according to research released today, including discoveries uncovered when looking at the underlying mechanisms that influence our ability to exercise self-control.

Physical and chemical changes in the brain during development can potentially play a role in some delinquent and deviant behaviors, according to research released today. Studies looking at the underlying mechanisms that influence our ability to exercise self-control were presented at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. Understanding the impact of changes in specific prefrontal regions during brain development could lead to new treatments and earlier interventions for disorders in which impulsivity plays a key factor. The research may have implications for understanding and dealing with aggressive and troublesome behaviors.

Today's new findings show that:

  • The absence of serotonin receptors during early development leads to highly aggressive and impulsive behaviors in mice. Impulsivity, but not aggression, returns to normal levels by reintroducing the receptors
  • Adolescents react more impulsively to danger than adults or children, and the prefrontal cortex works harder to exert control over impulsive responses to threatening cues

Other recent findings discussed show that:

  • Weak control of the brain's prefrontal cortex (which monitors personality, decision-making, and self-restraint) over regions associated with reward and motivation could explain the lack of self-control experienced by anti-social individuals
  • Criminal defendants increasingly use brain science to explain their actions, pointing to brain scans and the scientific literature for evidence that brain impairments affect behavior. This is impacting how the legal system assigns responsibility and punishment for criminal wrongdoing in the United States

"Our deeper understanding of the origins of delinquent behavior can be a double-edged sword," said press conference moderator BJ Casey, PhD, of Weill Cornell Medical College, an expert in attention, behavior, and related brain disorders. "While we're making tremendous gains in neuroscience that should lead to improved treatments, our biological insights also have implications for criminal cases and the judicial process that we need to understand."


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The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Neuroscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Neuroscience. "New evidence on biological basis of highly impulsive, aggressive behaviors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131110184358.htm>.
Society for Neuroscience. (2013, November 10). New evidence on biological basis of highly impulsive, aggressive behaviors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131110184358.htm
Society for Neuroscience. "New evidence on biological basis of highly impulsive, aggressive behaviors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131110184358.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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