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Close social proximity to gunshot victim may increase own risk of victimization

Date:
November 14, 2013
Source:
American Public Health Association (APHA)
Summary:
New research finds that within a high-crime African-American community, the closer an individual was to a gunshot victim socially, the greater their risk of also becoming a victim.
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New research from the American Journal of Public Health finds that within a high-crime African-American community, the closer an individual was to a gunshot victim socially, the greater their risk of also becoming a victim.

Within a Chicago area community of approximately 82,000 residents with characteristics profiled as homicide risk factors, researchers evaluated individual's probability of becoming a victim to homicide. In particular, within this community, the study evaluated individuals' social distance to a co-offending network -- where two or more people were arrested together for the same crime.

Findings from the study indicate that the risk of becoming a homicide victim increases with one's closer social proximity to homicide victims. Specifically, for every degree of separation from a victim, an individual would experience a 57 percent decrease in their odds of homicide victimization. In addition 41 percent of all gun homicides occurred within less than 4 percent of the neighborhood's population.

"By mapping the terrain within high-risk social networks and analyzing shooting patterns, network analysis offers a more direct road map for interventions. Thus, the approach advanced here would argue against sweeping policies and practices based on categorical distinctions such as gang membership or race and, instead, focus on intervention and prevention efforts that consider the observable and risky behavior of individuals," the authors suggest.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Public Health Association (APHA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrew V. Papachristos, Christopher Wildeman. Network Exposure and Homicide Victimization in an African American Community. American Journal of Public Health, 2013; e1 DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301441

Cite This Page:

American Public Health Association (APHA). "Close social proximity to gunshot victim may increase own risk of victimization." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131114193201.htm>.
American Public Health Association (APHA). (2013, November 14). Close social proximity to gunshot victim may increase own risk of victimization. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131114193201.htm
American Public Health Association (APHA). "Close social proximity to gunshot victim may increase own risk of victimization." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131114193201.htm (accessed September 4, 2015).

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