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Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift

Date:
November 16, 2013
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Hospitalized children are more likely to die after a cardiac arrest if it occurs during the night shift, according to research.
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Hospitalized children are more likely to die after a cardiac arrest if it occurs during the night shift, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013.

Adults who suffer a cardiac arrest while hospitalized are already known to fare worse if resuscitation is needed during the night shift.

This AHA Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation Registry study is the first documentation of a similar effect in children.

Of 10,541 consecutive cardiac arrests in patients under age 18 in 2000-10, the researchers found:

  • Thirty-four percent of children survived to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest during the night shift (11 p.m.-6:59 a.m.).
  • Thirty-eight percent of children survived after cardiac arrest on day or evening shifts.
  • Survival following nightshift cardiac arrest was 13 percent lower after accounting for differences in patient and hospital characteristics.

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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131116171153.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2013, November 16). Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131116171153.htm
American Heart Association. "Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131116171153.htm (accessed August 2, 2015).

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