Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists create perfect solution to iron out kinks in surfaces

Date:
November 20, 2013
Source:
Queen Mary, University of London
Summary:
A new technique that allows curved surfaces to appear flat to electromagnetic waves has been developed. The discovery could hail a step-change in how antennas are tailored to each platform, which could be useful to a number of industries that rely on high performance antennas for reliable and efficient wireless communications.

A new technique that allows curved surfaces to appear flat to electromagnetic waves has been developed by scientists at Queen Mary University of London.

The discovery could hail a step-change in how antennas are tailored to each platform, which could be useful to a number of industries that rely on high performance antennas for reliable and efficient wireless communications.

The researchers coated a curved surface with a medium where the refractive index -- a measure of how light passes through substances -- varies depending on the position of the wave. Although the coating is only a fraction of a wavelength thick, it can make the curvature appear invisible to surface waves.

The coating can be used as a cloak because the space created underneath the bumpy surface can shelter an object that would ordinarily have caused the wave to be scattered.

Professor of Antennas and Electromagnetics and study lead Yang Hao, said: "The design is based upon transformation optics, a concept behind the idea of the invisibility cloak. While the cloak is yet to be demonstrated 'perfect' in the free space, we have proved that it is possible for surface waves."

The underlying theory developed in this study has had a wide impact on the antennas and aerospace industry, which UK has strong presence internationally.

"With the demands of telecommunications systems in airborne and ground-based vehicles growing year by year, it is necessary to create antennas with ever increasing efficiency, yet keeping the weight and volume as low as possible," said co-author Dr Rhiannon Mitchell-Thomas from Queen Mary's School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science.

"When electromagnetic waves encounter a bump in the surface, this alters their characteristics and decreases the efficiency of the antenna. Using this new technique, a bespoke surface wave antenna can be designed to fit the precise shape of the platform."

Co-author Oscar Quevedo-Teruel also from Queen Mary's School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science added: "This type of integrated antenna system can be applied for any frequency band from microwave to optics, leading to ultra-fast wireless communication over the surface in the near future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen Mary, University of London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. C. Mitchell-Thomas, T. M. Mcmanus, O. Quevedo-Teruel, S. A. R. Horsley, and Y. Hao. Perfect Surface Wave Cloaks. Physical Review Letters, 2013 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.213901

Cite This Page:

Queen Mary, University of London. "Scientists create perfect solution to iron out kinks in surfaces." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120100627.htm>.
Queen Mary, University of London. (2013, November 20). Scientists create perfect solution to iron out kinks in surfaces. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120100627.htm
Queen Mary, University of London. "Scientists create perfect solution to iron out kinks in surfaces." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120100627.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Argentina's Tax Evaders Detected, Hunted Down by Drones

Argentina's Tax Evaders Detected, Hunted Down by Drones

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) Argentina doesn't only have Lionel Messi the footballer, it has now also acquired "Mesi" the drone system which monitors undeclared mansions, swimming pools and soy fields to curb tax evasion in the country. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CERN Celebrates 60 Years of Science

CERN Celebrates 60 Years of Science

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 29, 2014) CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, celebrates 60 years of bringing nations together through science. As Joanna Partridge reports from inside the famous science centre it's also planning to turn the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator back on after an upgrade. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
This 'Invisibility Cloak' Is Simpler Than Most

This 'Invisibility Cloak' Is Simpler Than Most

Newsy (Sep. 28, 2014) Researchers from the University of Rochester have created a type of invisibility cloak with simple focal lenses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins