Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dying from food allergy less likely than being murdered

Date:
November 25, 2013
Source:
Imperial College London
Summary:
A person with a food allergy is more likely to be murdered than to die from a severe reaction, according to a new study.

A person with a food allergy is more likely to be murdered than to die from a severe reaction, according to a new study.

One in 10 children has a food allergy. Many sufferers and their parents experience anxiety about the possibility of a severe and life-threatening allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis, but until now no studies have estimated how common death from such reactions is.

Based on data from 13 studies worldwide, researchers at Imperial College London calculated that for any person with a food allergy, the chance of dying from anaphylaxis in one year is 1.81 in a million. For children and young people aged 0-19, the risk is 3.25 in a million.

By comparison, in Europe the risk of being murdered is 11 in a million and of dying from accidental causes is 324 in a million over a year.

Dr Robert Boyle, from the Department of Medicine at Imperial, who led the study, said: "Everyone has heard stories of people who have died suddenly from a severe allergic reaction, and these stories are frightening. But events like this appear to be very rare, and it's helpful to put that risk in perspective.

"We don't want to belittle the concerns of people with food allergies or their families, and of course people should continue to take reasonable precautions. That said, we want to reassure them that having a food allergy makes a very small difference to someone's overall risk of death.

"Worrying about severe allergic reactions can take a huge toll on someone's quality of life. We should address anxiety and quality of life for food allergic people and their carers, rather than just focus on the risk of death."

The study is published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy. It was funded by Lincoln Medical and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre.

Food allergies appear to be becoming more common. Hospital admissions for children with food allergies have risen five times in the last 20 years, but the reason for this trend is unclear.

Typical allergic reactions involve swelling, rash, or eczema. The reason why severe, life-threatening reactions sometimes occur is not known. The dose of allergen plays a role in determining the risk, but the dose required to trigger anaphylaxis varies widely. Anaphylaxis is most common in young people, but doctors have no way to tell which patients are most susceptible.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Imperial College London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. Umasunthar, J. Leonardi-Bee, M. Hodes, P. J. Turner, C. Gore, P. Habibi, J. O. Warner, R. J. Boyle. Incidence of fatal food anaphylaxis in people with food allergy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2013; 43 (12): 1333 DOI: 10.1111/cea.12211

Cite This Page:

Imperial College London. "Dying from food allergy less likely than being murdered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131125091521.htm>.
Imperial College London. (2013, November 25). Dying from food allergy less likely than being murdered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 14, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131125091521.htm
Imperial College London. "Dying from food allergy less likely than being murdered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131125091521.htm (accessed September 14, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 12, 2014) Hundreds of children in several states have been stricken by a serious respiratory illness that is spreading across the U.S. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 12, 2014) The World Health Organisation warns that local health workers in West Africa can't keep up with Ebola - and among those countries hardest hit by the outbreak, the economic damage is coming into focus, too. As David Pollard reports, Sierra Leone admits that growth in one of the poorest economies in the region is taking a beating. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins