Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers find metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure

Date:
January 15, 2014
Source:
Joslin Diabetes Center
Summary:
A new study that compares the metabolic fingerprints of patients who develop ESRD versus those who don’t has furnished new clues to the disease.

January 15, 2013 -- About 33 percent of people with type 2 diabetes suffer kidney damage that progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), at which point they require either dialysis or kidney transplantation. Scientists have thought that this kidney disease is driven by damage to the glomeruli, blood vessels in the kidney, which spill the protein albumin into the urine. Current treatments targeting the resulting "albuminuria" do not prevent kidney failure.

Related Articles


However, a new study by Joslin Diabetes Center researchers that compares the metabolic fingerprints of patients who develop ESRD versus those who don't has furnished new clues to the disease.

Published in Kidney International, the study is distinctive in examining the metabolism of patients while they were still healthy or in very early stages of the disease, and in the breadth of metabolic factors analyzed, says lead author Monika Niewczas, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Niewczas is an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and a research associate in the laboratory of Andrzej Krolewski, M.D., Ph.D., head of Joslin's Section on Genetics and Epidemiology and senior author on the paper.

The analysis drew on the Joslin Kidney Study, selecting 40 patients from that study who progressed to ESRD and 40 patients who remained alive without ESRD during 8-12 years of follow-up. The Joslin researchers used global mass spectrometry to look for levels of approximately 2,400 metabolites (molecules produced during metabolism) in plasma samples from the patients.

Among the results, the scientists found 16 "uremic solute" molecules present in much higher levels in those who would go on to develop ESRD than those who would not develop the condition.

Uremic solutes are known to accumulate in plasma in the presence of kidney failure. Dr. Niewczas stresses that at the time of the sample collection kidney function was normal in the vast majority of the study subjects, suggesting that these molecules could either mark early stages of the disease or actually contribute to it.

Injury to the kidney's tubular cells is one potential mechanism by which those metabolites might lead to kidney failure. "Many of the uremic solutes that were increased are handled by the tubules and are actively secreted by those cells," Niewczas says. The high levels of these metabolites might be a sign of tubular injury, and they might also contribute to this injury.

Additionally, the researchers found a strong correlation between higher concentrations of myo-inositol, a metabolite involved in insulin signaling and in many other biological processes, and progression to ESRD.

"Metabolomics is an exciting new field, and this exploratory study is rich in very robust findings," says Niewczas. "Until now, researchers generally were focusing their studies on uremic solutes just at the single-metabolite level, but here we used a very robust, high-throughput platform that screened a few thousand metabolites instead."

"Alterations of metabolism in general are key to diabetes, and studies like this may have huge potential for unraveling new pathways which will lead to developing new drugs and new diagnostic tests," she adds.

Earlier findings by the Krolewski lab may be already headed toward clinical diagnostic use. In 2012, researchers found that high concentrations of the proteins TNFR1 and TNFR2 in blood accurately predict the risk of kidney function loss in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes 10 years in advance. This work has been licensed to a firm that develops diagnostic tests, and a clinical test will be available in the near future, says Niewczas.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Joslin Diabetes Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Monika A Niewczas, Tammy L Sirich, Anna V Mathew, Jan Skupien, Robert P Mohney, James H Warram, Adam Smiles, Xiaoping Huang, Walker Walker, Jaeman Byun, Edward D Karoly, Elizabeth M Kensicki, Gerard T Berry, Joseph V Bonventre, Subramaniam Pennathur, Timothy W Meyer, Andrzej S Krolewski. Uremic solutes and risk of end-stage renal disease in type 2 diabetes: metabolomic study. Kidney International, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ki.2013.497

Cite This Page:

Joslin Diabetes Center. "Researchers find metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115095850.htm>.
Joslin Diabetes Center. (2014, January 15). Researchers find metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115095850.htm
Joslin Diabetes Center. "Researchers find metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115095850.htm (accessed April 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone have been busy fighting the menace created by the deadly Ebola virus, but illicit drug lords have taken advantage of the situation to advance the drug trade. Duration: 01:12 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The Indian government declared victory over leprosy in 2005, but the disease is making a comeback in some parts of the country, with more than a hundred thousand lepers still living in colonies, shunned from society. Duration: 02:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

AP (Mar. 31, 2015) Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn&apos;t wait to slip on her new robohand. The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed it as soon as it came off a 3-D printer. (March 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 31, 2015) The Solitair device aims to take the confusion out of how much sunlight we should expose our skin to. Small enough to be worn as a tie or hair clip, it monitors the user&apos;s sun exposure by taking into account their skin pigment, location and schedule. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins