Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Increasing trend in home birth neonatal mortality rates

Date:
February 3, 2014
Source:
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Summary:
Patients delivered babies at home by midwives had a roughly four times higher risk of neonatal deaths than babies delivered in the hospital by midwives. The increased neonatal mortality risk is associated with the location of a planned birth, rather than the credentials of the person delivering the baby.

In a study presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in New Orleans, researchers will report that patients delivered at home by midwives had a roughly four times higher risk of neonatal deaths than babies delivered in the hospital by midwives. The increased neonatal mortality risk is associated with the location of a planned birth, rather than the credentials of the person delivering the baby.

Related Articles


The number of homebirths in the United States has grown over the last decade. In the largest study of its kind, using Centers for Disease Control data on nearly 14 million linked infant birth and neonatal death data, term singleton U.S. births, researchers at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center found the absolute risk of neonatal mortality was 3.2/10,000 births in midwife hospital births, and 12.6/10,000 births in midwife home births, and it further increased in first-time mothers to 21.9/10,000 births in midwife home deliveries. Neonatal mortality was defined as neonatal deaths up to 28 days after delivery.

"This risk further increased to about seven-fold if this was the mother's first pregnancy, and to about ten-fold in pregnancies beyond 41 weeks," said Amos Grunebaum, M.D.

The excess total neonatal mortality for deliveries performed by home midwives was 9.3/10,000 births or about 18-19 excess neonatal deaths a year from midwife homebirths. Based on the most recent 2012 births data, the authors concluded that if home births by midwives continue to grow at the present 10 percent yearly rate, then the excess total neonatal mortality of home births by midwives would nearly double from about 16-17 in 2009 to about 32 in 2016.

Given the study's findings, Amos Grunebaum, M.D. and Frank Chervenak, M.D., the main authors of the study, said that obstetric practitioners have an ethical obligation to disclose the increased absolute and relative risks associated with planned home birth to expectant parents who express an interest in this delivery setting, and to recommend strongly against it.

The authors also continued to say that hospitals should create a welcoming and comfortable birthing environment, as well as address unnecessary obstetric interventions, both of which are often a primary motivation for planned homebirth.

Study co-authors include Laurence B. McCullough, Ph.D., at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medical College, Katherine J. Sapra, MPH, at Columbia University, Robert L. Brent M.D., Ph.D., at Thomas Jefferson University and Weill Cornell Medical College, Malcolm I. Levene, M.D., FRCP, FRCPCH at the University of Leeds, and Birgit Arabin, M.D., at Philipps University and Clara Angela Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Increasing trend in home birth neonatal mortality rates." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203084527.htm>.
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. (2014, February 3). Increasing trend in home birth neonatal mortality rates. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203084527.htm
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Increasing trend in home birth neonatal mortality rates." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203084527.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins