Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New treatment for metastatic prostate cancer

Date:
February 12, 2014
Source:
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Summary:
An American hospital has treated three men with a recently FDA-approved treatment for prostate cancer, which offers new options for men whose cancer has spread to their bones. The treatment’s trade name is Xofigo (or radium-223 dichloride). It is an alpha particle-emitting radioactive therapeutic agent with an anti-tumor effect.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center has treated three men with a recently FDA-approved treatment, which offers new options for men whose prostate cancer has spread to their bones. The treatment's trade name is Xofigo® (or radium-223 dichloride). It is an alpha particle-emitting radioactive therapeutic agent with an anti-tumor effect.

Treatment entails an injection each week, up to six injections if needed. "When compared with the best existing standard of care, research shows that patients receiving radium-223 injections live longer," said Thomas C. Sroka, MD, PhD, radiation oncologist, Norris Cotton Cancer Center. "It is also very tolerable," he said, "with few side effects."

Sroka explains that the agent is made to look like calcium so it is easily absorbed into the bone. "This radioisotope is precise, settling into the right place, with minimal damage to surrounding tissue," said Sroka. It targets area of increased bone turnover, which is the case in bone metastases. The high-energy alpha-particle from Radium-223 deposits its energy over a very short distance (less than 100 micrometers), which is how it limits damage to surrounding normal tissue.

Xofigo was approved by FDA in May of 2013 and is the first agent of its kind. Clinical trials of the drug showed an improvement of overall survival time from 11.3 months to 14.9 months versus placebo. The most common side effects are nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and peripheral edema.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. If it spreads to other places in the body, prostate cancer predominantly settles in the bones. Bone metastases are a leading cause of death in men with prostate cancer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "New treatment for metastatic prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144513.htm>.
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. (2014, February 12). New treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144513.htm
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "New treatment for metastatic prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144513.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) — After four months in the hospital, the first quintuplets to be born at Baylor University Medical Center head home. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) — A U.S. aid worker infected with Ebola while working in West Africa will be treated in a high security ward at Emory University in Atlanta. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) — Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) — Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins