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First global geologic map of Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede details an icy world

Date:
February 12, 2014
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Summary:
More than 400 years after its discovery by Galileo, the largest moon in the solar system has finally claimed a spot on the map. A team of scientists has produced the first global geologic map of Ganymede, a Galilean moon of Jupiter. The map technically illustrates the varied geologic character of Ganymede's surface, and is the first complete global geologic map of an icy, outer-planet moon.

To present the best information in a single view of Jupiter's moon Ganymede, a global image mosaic was assembled, incorporating the best available imagery from Voyagers 1 and 2 and Galileo spacecraft. This image shows Ganymede centered at 200 west longitude. This mosaic (right) served as the base map for the geologic map of Ganymede (left).
Credit: USGS

More than 400 years after its discovery by Galileo, the largest moon in the solar system has finally claimed a spot on the map.

A team of scientists led by Wes Patterson of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), Laurel, Md., and Geoffrey Collins of Wheaton College, Norton, Mass., has produced the first global geologic map of Ganymede, a Galilean moon of Jupiter. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey, the map technically illustrates the varied geologic character of Ganymede's surface, and is the first complete global geologic map of an icy, outer-planet moon.

Patterson, Collins and colleagues used images from NASA's Voyager and Galileo missions to create the map. It's only the fourth of its kind covering a planetary satellite; similar maps exist for Earth's moon as well as Jupiter's moons Io and Callisto.

"By mapping all of Ganymede's surface, we can more accurately address scientific questions regarding the formation and evolution of this truly unique moon," says Patterson, a planetary scientist.

Since its discovery in January 1610, Ganymede has been the focus of repeated observation, first by Earth-based telescopes, and later by flyby missions and spacecraft orbiting Jupiter. These studies depict a complex icy world whose surface is characterized by the striking contrast between its two major terrain types: the dark, very old, highly cratered regions; and the lighter, somewhat younger (but still ancient) regions marked with an extensive array of grooves and ridges.  

With a diameter of 3,280 miles (5,262 kilometers), Ganymede is larger than both planet Mercury and dwarf planet Pluto. It's also the only satellite in the solar system known to have its own magnetosphere. The map details geologic features of the moon that formed and evolved over much of our solar system's history. These features record evidence of Ganymede's internal evolution, its dynamical interactions with the other Galilean satellites, and the evolution of the small bodies that have impacted Ganymede's surface.

The new chart will be a valuable tool for researchers to compare the geologic characters of other icy moons, since almost any type of feature that is found on other icy satellites has a similar feature somewhere on Ganymede. And with a surface over half as large as all the land area on Earth, Ganymede offers a wide variety of locations to observe. "Ganymede also shows features that are ancient alongside much more recently formed features, adding historical diversity in addition to geographic diversity," Collins says.

Along with Collins and Patterson, the Ganymede mapping team also includes Louise Prockter of APL; James Head, Brown University, Providence, R.I.; Robert Pappalardo, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Baerbel Lucchitta, USGS, Flagstaff, Ariz.; and Jonathan Kay, University of Idaho. NASA funded the project through its Outer Planets Research and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs.

The map is available for download at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3237/.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. "First global geologic map of Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede details an icy world." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144524.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. (2014, February 12). First global geologic map of Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede details an icy world. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144524.htm
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. "First global geologic map of Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede details an icy world." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212144524.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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