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ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children

Date:
February 12, 2014
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Children who take medication to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder don't appear to be at increased stroke risk, according to a study.
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Children who take medication to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) don't appear to be at increased stroke risk, according to a new study.

The research was presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014.

In a study of 2.5 million 2- to 19-year-olds over a 14-year period, researchers compared stimulant medication usage in children diagnosed with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke to stimulant usage in children without stroke.

Researchers found no association between stroke risk and the use of ADHD stimulant medications at the time of stroke or at any time prior to stroke.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212183652.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2014, February 12). ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212183652.htm
American Heart Association. "ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212183652.htm (accessed May 25, 2015).

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