Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Muscle loss ups mortality, sepsis risk in liver transplant candidates

Date:
February 13, 2014
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Researchers have determined that sarcopenia -- a loss of skeletal muscle mass—increases risk of sepsis and mortality risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation. Findings suggest that post-transplant sepsis was reduced in candidates with sarcopenia who received early nutritional support with a feeding tube, known as enteral nutrition.

Japanese researchers have determined that sarcopenia -- a loss of skeletal muscle mass -- increases risk of sepsis and mortality risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation. Findings published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, suggest that post-transplant sepsis was reduced in candidates with sarcopenia who received early nutritional support with a feeding tube, known as enteral nutrition.

While sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle connected to bones, is associated with aging, studies have shown it can occur in patients with chronic diseases such as cancer, liver disease, and malnutrition. In fact, research by Montano-Loza et al. found that more than 40% of those with liver cirrhosis also had sarcopenia, which was linked to higher mortality rates in these patients regardless of the degree of liver injury.

The present study, led by Ken Shirabe, MD, PhD from Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan evaluated 204 patients prior to living-donor liver transplantation between November 2003 and December 2011. Computed tomography (CT) scans were taken of patients to measure muscle mass along the lower back region (psoas muscle).

Close to 50% of subjects were diagnosed with sarcopenia; 58% in men and 36% in women. Analyses indicate that patients with sarcopenia had a 2-fold higher risk of death than those without muscle loss. Sarcopenia was independently linked to overall survival and a predictor of sepsis following transplantation.

Enteral nutrition was provided within 48 hours of transplantation in 24% of candidates undergoing live-donor liver transplants from 2003 to 2007, and in 100% of subjects transplanted in 2008 through 2011. After providing routine nutritional support, the incidence of sepsis dropped from 28% (2003-2007) to 11% (2008-2011) in the transplant candidates.

"Our findings indicate that sarcopenia independently predicts mortality and increases sepsis risk in live-donor liver transplant recipient," concludes Dr. Shirabe. "Sepsis was reduced in patients with sarcopenia when nutritional intervention was used. Treatment of malnutrition in transplant candidates may reduce risk of death following transplantation, but larger studies are needed to confirm this evidence."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Toshiro Masuda, Ken Shirabe, Toru Ikegami, Norifumi Harimoto, Tomoharu Yoshizumi, Yuji Soejima, Hideaki Uchiyama, Tetsuo Ikeda, Hideo Baba, Yoshihiko Maehara. Sarcopenia is a prognostic factor in living donor liver transplantation. Liver Transplantation, 2013; DOI: 10.1002/lt.23811

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Muscle loss ups mortality, sepsis risk in liver transplant candidates." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112638.htm>.
Wiley. (2014, February 13). Muscle loss ups mortality, sepsis risk in liver transplant candidates. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112638.htm
Wiley. "Muscle loss ups mortality, sepsis risk in liver transplant candidates." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112638.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins