Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Revolutionizing healthcare through remote monitoring of patients

Date:
February 27, 2014
Source:
University of Surrey
Summary:
A new research program has been launched called eSMART (Electronic Symptom Management using ASyMS Remote Technology), that uses mobile phone technology to remotely monitor patients who are undergoing chemotherapy to treat breast, bowel and blood cancers. The Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) allows patients to report the side effects from their chemotherapy via a mobile phone. This information is immediately sent securely to a computer, which assesses their symptoms and triggers alerts to doctors or nurses within minutes if they require specialist intervention. The system also provides patients with real-time information and advice on how to manage their symptoms at home, without the need to travel to hospital.

The Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) allows patients to report the side effects from their chemotherapy via a mobile phone. The system provides patients with real-time information and advice on how to manage their symptoms at home, without the need to travel to hospital.
Credit: vadymvdrobot / Fotolia

Researchers from the University of Surrey have today launched a new program of research called eSMART (Electronic Symptom Management using ASyMS Remote Technology), that uses mobile phone technology to remotely monitor patients who are undergoing chemotherapy to treat breast, bowel and blood cancers.

The Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) allows patients to report the side effects from their chemotherapy via a mobile phone. This information is immediately sent securely to a computer, which assesses their symptoms and triggers alerts to doctors or nurses within minutes if they require specialist intervention.

The system also provides patients with real-time information and advice on how to manage their symptoms at home, without the need to travel to hospital.

Researchers believe that using ASyMS will reduce the side effects of chemotherapy, and help to identify and treat those which are life-threatening much quicker than current care systems. In addition, it is anticipated that the use of ASyMS will significantly reduce healthcare costs.

A €6 million grant from the European Union will fund a large 1,000 patient trial in England, Austria, Greece, Holland, Ireland and Norway, with the hope that the new system will be integrated into routine cancer care in the future. The research team is also developing and testing the system for use by people with other types of cancer and long-term conditions such as heart failure.

"Over 3 million people are diagnosed with cancer each year in Europe and it is likely that this number will increase by at least 65% over the next 20 years," said Nora Kearney, Professor of Cancer Care at the University of Surrey and Principal Investigator.

"Given this predicted increase, the need for personalised cancer care is becoming even more crucial. Our system will give patients continual support both during and after chemotherapy, while allowing them to remain in the comfort of their own homes. It will revolutionise the way our healthcare system supports people with cancer."

Kathi Apostolidis, Vice President of The European Cancer Patient Coalition (ECPC) one of the partners on the eSMART project, said: "In many European countries, patients undergoing chemotherapy, experience great difficulties in coping with the adverse events and the anxiety during their therapy and between treatments.

"Usually, patients with cancer are given instructions on how to cope with side effects, at the beginning of their treatment. However, in many European countries, it is not possible, or very difficult for patients to consult their oncologist or oncology nurse to discuss problems or concerns arising from their chemotherapy, outside pre-arranged medical appointments. ECPC believes that eSMART will be an urgently needed solution to get a quick response to the problems and anxiety that cancer patients face during chemotherapy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Surrey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Surrey. "Revolutionizing healthcare through remote monitoring of patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227091430.htm>.
University of Surrey. (2014, February 27). Revolutionizing healthcare through remote monitoring of patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227091430.htm
University of Surrey. "Revolutionizing healthcare through remote monitoring of patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227091430.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says he expects revised CDC protocols on Ebola to focus on training, observation and ensuring health care workers are more protected. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins